(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The dial"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/dial1936fram 



gingham State CoJJage 
"WWgham, ^assachStte 



X 





THE DIAL 




DEDICATION 



lo Oaran D. (^>u 



mmi 



n 8 ! 



IN APPRECIATION OF HER ENTHUSIASTIC LEADERSHIP 

AND GENUINE FRIENDLINESS -- TRUE INSPIRATION FOR 

"MAKING THE MOST OF ONE'S INNATE CAPACITIES" 

WE THE CLASS OF 1936 DEDICATE THIS VOLUME 




370,7 




To {Le (glass of 1936 

'YOU TO THE LEFT AND I TO THE RIGHT 

FOR THE WAYS OF MEN MUST SEVER- 

AND IT WELL MAY BE FOR A DAY AND A NIGHT 

AND IT WELL MAY BE FOREVER 

BUT WHETHER WE MEET OR WHETHER WE PART 

(FOR OUR WAYS ARE PAST OUR KNOWING), 

A PLEDGE FROM THE HEART TO ITS FELLOW-HEART 

ON THE WAYS WE ALL ARE GOING! 

HERE'S LUCK!" 

RICHARD HOVEY CUMMINGS. 



WH1 :'. 

FraiT,.,, ii 
Framingiic 



i LIBRARY 
- ts College 
Massachusetts 




FOREWORD 



In publishing this volume, the Senior 
Class wishes to give recognition to the 
year 1936 as a year of transition. Symbolic 
of this period stands the new administra- 
tion building slowly taking form as a monu- 
ment to the achievements of the college in 
the past and a challenge to its greater 
progress in the future. 

For yet another reason this year is a 
transitional year, for it marks the retirement 
of Mr. Bagnall as president of our college. 
His intense interest in the activities and 
traditions of our school has done much 
toward the development of greater oppor- 
tunities for us in study and in college life. 
It is with great love and respect that we 
include him as a member of our graduating 
class. 

Following the trend of the times, the 
Dial has taken this opportunity to change its 
composition. Although these changes have 
been varied and fundamental, we have still 
tried to bring you old familiar scenes which 
you may look back upon in the years to 
come with a warm rush of happy recollec- 
tions of your years at Framingham. 



0ONTLNT5 




TRIBUTE 
SENIOR CLASS 
JUNIOR CLASS 
SOPHOMORE CLASS 
FRESHMAN CLASS 
SENIOR BIOGRAPHY 
ORGANIZATIONS 
ATHLETICS 
HUMOR 
ADVERTISEMENTS 





^ 



MAY HALL 





^ 



HORACE MANN PORTICO 








VOCATIONAL HOUSE DOORWAY 





^ 



THE DRIVE 




^ 



HORACE MANN DOORWAY 





VIEW FROM ENTRANCE TO MAY HALL 



BLESSED ARE THEY WHO HAVE THE GIFT 
OF MAKING FRIENDS, FOR IT IS ONE OF 
GOD'S BEST GIFTS. IT INVOLVES MANY 
THINGS, BUT ABOVE ALL, THE POWER OF 
GOING OUT OF ONE'S SELF, AND APPRE- 
CIATING WHATEVER IS NOBLE AND LOV- 
ING IN ANOTHER. 



S4 TRIBUTE 





Time which seems so potent as a factor in life and is so often applied as a measure 
of existence, is relatively unimportant. A truer measure is embodied in worthwhile 
things accomplished, endeavors launched, influence disseminated; and by such measure 
would we evaluate the administration of Mr. Bagnall in its brief span from 1930-1936. 

With clear insight into the character and needs of Framingham, he has quietly and 
indefatigably given himself to its problems. These years have been difficult ones in the 
life of every college, but under his leadership Framingham has emerged with an en- 
rollment maintained at nearly its usual level, several new courses established, and higher 
academic standards. On December 23, 1935, ground was actually broken for the new 
administration and classroom building for which Mr. Bagnall has worked long and 
efficiently at a sacrifice of his time and strength. 

The door of his office has always been open, a policy consistent with his deep 
interest in the life of the student body and his keen desire to help whenever and where- 
ever he can. To the Student Council he has accorded the position of trust and influence 
it has merited; to the other varied activities he has given a place in the curriculum. Nor 
has any function, serious or frolicsome, been a complete success without the presence 
of Mr. and Mrs. Bagnall. 




This genuine friendliness and "sincerity of spirit" is characteristic, not only of Mr. 
Bagnall, but also of Mrs. Bagnall who has helped to temper the academic atmosphere 
with a homelike and personal quality. Our awareness of this feeling is the cumulative 
effect of many little acts; — their personal messages to those in trouble, their Good 
Samaritanship, their annual Christmas greetings which will abide with us always as an 
expression of their generous personalities. And those who have lived on the Hill have 
counted it a privilege to have known Mr. Bagnall's sister whose interest in teaching 
and in young people early established a strong bond of sympathy with both students 
and faculty. 

Mr. Bagnall's message to his first graduating class in the Dial of 1931 is an epitome 
of his purpose and practice during his years of service at Framingham. ' Love your work 
with all its opportunities, privileges, and satisfactions 



And so, in the simple realities of loving, trusting, daring, serving give to the world the 
best you have, that the best may come back to you.' 

We are indebted to Mr. Bagnall for all he has given to Framingham and sincerely 
wish that "the best may come back" to him. 



V 



"FOR I REMEMBER STOPPING BY THE WAY 

TO WATCH A POTTER THUMPING HIS WET CLAY." 



FACULTY 





FRANCIS A. BAGNALL 

President 

To the Class of 1936 is commended the inspiring appeal of 
one of America's greatest thinkers and writers. 

"If we work upon marble, it will perish; if we work upon 
brass, time will efface it; if we rear temples, they will crumble 
into dust; but if we work upon immortal minds, and imbue 
them with principles and with a just fear of God and love of 
their fellow men, we engrave on those tablets something 
that will brighten up all eternity." 

— Webster. 




FRED W. ARCHIBALD 
Pleasant Street, Framingham 

Music 
Tufts Summer School; Harvard Summer School; Normal Music 
School. Supervisor of Music, Public Schools of Eastern 
Massachusetts,- Salem Normal School; Instructor in Boston 
University Summer School; Baritone Soloist; Chorus and 
Choir Work. 

"Every heart that has beat strong and cheerful has left a 
hopeful impulse behind it in the world, and bettered the 
tradition of mankind." 

— Aes Triplex. 




sbft 



& 



SARA M. ARMSTRONG 

Pleasant Street, Framingham 

Psychology, Education 

A.B., Tufts College, A.M., Columbia University; Instructor 

at Danbury Normal School. 

Began teaching in State Teachers College at Framingham in 
1918. 

"Be square without being angular. Be honest without 
being mean. Be upright without being punctilious. Be 
brilliant without being showy." 

— Lao Tzu — 6th Century B.C. 




CHARLES E. DONER 
Reading, Mass. 

Penmanship 
Diploma, Zanerian School of Penmanship, Columbus, Ohio,- 
Heffley School of Commerce, Brooklyn,- Spencerial Com- 
mercial School, Cleveland,- Editorial Staff, Business Journal, 
New York; Commercial Teachers Federation,- Zanerian Pen- 
manship Association; New England Penmanship Association. 

"Every good that is worth possessing must be paid for in 
strokes of daily effort." 






LOU LOMBARD 
29 Denwood Avenue, Takoma Park, Maryland 

Resident Supervisor of Vocational Household Arts 
Diploma, State Normal School at Framingham,- B.S., University 
of Minnesota,- Teacher of Cookery, Washington, D.C.; 
Home Demonstration Agent, University of Minnesota,- In- 
structor of Foods in Teacher Training Department, University 
of Minnesota,- Consultant in Nutrition, Massachusetts De- 
partment of Health. 

"To improve the golden moment of opportunity and catch 
the good that is within our reach, is the great art of life." 

— Samuel Johnson. 




LOUIE G. RAMSDELL 
9 Church Street, Framingham 

Geography 
Diploma, State Normal School, Framingham, Ph. B., University 
of Chicago; M.S., University of Chicago. 

"Leadership, I take it, is a task of suggestion, of adaptation, 
of the quickening of thought and the devising of means." 

— Woodrow Wilson. 




ELLA C. RITCHIE 
Framingham, Mass. 

Librarian 
Graduate, Centenary Collegiate Institute, Hackettstown, N.J.,- 
B.S., Simmons College; Course at Boston University,- Librarian, 
State Normal School, Bloomsburg, Penna.,- Air Service, War 
Department, D.C.; Cataloguer Free Public Library, Endicott, 

N. y. 

"To each is given a bag of tools, 
A shapeless mass and a book of rules, 
And each must, make, ere life is flown, 
A stumbling block or a stepping stone." 





ANNE ROCHEFORT 
35 Salem End Road, Framingham 

Director of Trainins and Instructor in Mathematics 
Diploma, State Normal School at Bridgewater,- B.S., Columbia 
University; M.A., New York University. Service in Public 
Schools of Massachusetts; Normal Practice School at Framing- 
ham; Prince School of Store Service; Simmons College,- 
Cleveland School of Education; School of Education, New 
York University. 

"It is something to face the sun and know you are free. 
To hold your head high in the shafts of daylight slanting 

the earth 
And know your heart has kept a promise and the blood 

runs clear,- 
It is something." 

— from Clean Hands by Carl Sandburg. 



EDITH A. SAVAGE 

Dean 

Diploma, State Teachers College at Framingham; Certificate 
for Institutional Management from Simmons College,- B.S. 
In Education from Boston University. Teacher of grades in 
Agawam, Medfield and Boston. Training teacher at Spelman 
College in Atlanta, Georgia,- Teacher and Social Worker 
at Welcome House and Taletha Clinic in Boston,- Director of 
Children's Home in Manchester, N.H.; House Director of 
Y. W. C. A. in Holyoke, Mass. 

"A cultured man is genuine through and through. 
His observable behavior is an expression of what he is 
within." 





MARJORIE SPARROW 
1140 Boylston Street, Chestnut Hill 

English 
A.B., Radcliffe College, 1914; M.A., Wellesley College. 
1931; Composition Tutor at Wellesley and Wheaton Colleges 

"Wisdom is the thing a man gets after he has run his knowl- 
edge through the mill of experience." 

— A. E. Wiggam. 




sib 




HAZEL REUTHER NIETZOLD 
303 South Street, Northampton 

Assistant Practical Arts Department 
B.S., Massachusetts School of Art, 1928; Summer Sessions, 
Massachusetts State College, Berkshire Summer School of 
Art; Courses at Boston University, Museum School of Fine 
Arts, Massachusetts School of Art Evening School, and 
University Extension Courses,- Assistant Art Supervisor, 
Framingham, 1929; Assistant Art Supervisor, Weymouth 
1929-1933. 

"Everything has its beauty but not everyone sees it." 

— Confucius. 



FREDERICK WALTER RIED 

45 Harrington Street, Newtonville 

Diploma, Massachusetts School of Art; Civilian War Service 
with U. S. S. Board; Ex-president Massachusetts School of 
Art Alumni Association; Ex-president Massachusetts Art 
Teachers Association. 

"Life begins when you get there." 




BERNICE W. TAYLOR 
1431 Broadway, Haverhill 

Physical Education 
Graduate, Sargent School of Physical Education,- Special 
Diploma, B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity,- Taught in Haverhill Playgrounds,- Public Schools, Hoosick 
Falls, New York,- Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia,- 
Sargent School Camp,- State Normal Summer School at 
Hyannis. 

"Manners are the happy way of doing things." 

— Emerson. 



LOUISE KINGMAN 
239 Weston Road, Wellesley 

Speech, Physical Education, Director of Dramatics 
Diploma, State Normal School, Framingham; Rice School of 
Theatre, Oak Bluffs,- Leland Powers School of Spoken Word, 
Boston. Teacher of Dance and Pageantry at Columbia College 
of Expression and Normal School of Physical Education, 
Chicago. 

"Self-command is the main elegance." 

— Emerson. 






GRACE BROWN GARDNER 
53 Milk Street, Nantucket 

Biology, Microbiology, Nature Study 

Diploma, State Normal School at Bridgewater,- A.B., Cornell 
University; A.M., Brown University,- Primary Schools, New 
Bedford; Harrington Normal Training School, New Bedford, 
Head of Department of Biology, B.M.C., Durfee High School, 
Fall River. 

"Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, 
we must carry it with us, or we find it not." 

— Emerson. 



WILLIAM H. D. MEIER 
1 77 State Street, Framingham 

Head of Department of Biology 

Diploma, Illinois State Normal University, A.M., Ph.D., 
Harvard; Teacher rural schools, principal high schools, 
superintendent city schools in Illinois; Instructor of Botany, 
Harvard University, Fellow of American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, Author, "Herbarium and Plant 
Description," "Plant Study," "Animal Study," "School and 
Home Gardens," "Study of Living Things," "Open Doors 
to Science" with Otis W. Caldwell, "Exercises in Science," 
and "Essentials of Biology" with Lois Meier, and "Biology 
Notebook" with Dorothy Meier. 




DEBORAH M. RUSSELL 
4 Hudson Street, Worcester 

Chemistry, Nutrition 

Diploma, State Normal School, Framingham,- Chief Dietitian, 
Boston Floating Hospital; Summer Courses, Columbia Uni- 
versity,- B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University; A.M., 
Columbia University; Courses, Boston University and Harvard 
University,- Member, American Chemical Society, American 
Association for the Advancement of Science. 

"No soul can soar too loftily whose aim 
Is God-given Truth and brother-love of man." 

— J. Bayard Taylor. 

STUART B. FOSTER 
31 Salem End Road, Framingham 

Chemistry, Nutrition 

B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1914; Assistant 
chemist, McClure Laboratories, Westfield, Mass., 1915-1917; 
First Lieutenant Sanitary Corps, American Expeditionary 
Forces, 1917-1919; A.M., 1921, Ph.D., 1925, Columbia 
University; Member, American Chemical Society; American 
Association for the Advancement of Science. 

"If arithmetic, mensuration, and weighing, be taken away 
from any art, that which remains will not be much." 

—Plato. 



ELEANOR F. CHASE 
45 Highland Street, Amesbury 

Chemistry 

B.S., Massachusetts Agricultural College; M.S., Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College,- Assistant in Chemistry, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College,- Research Assistant in Food 
Chemistry, and Graduate Student Art Columbia University,- 
Ph.D., Columbia University. 

"You would not think any duty small if you yourself are 
great." 

— MacDonald. 





ARLINE POOLE 
27 Owatonna Street, Auburndale 

Sophomore Clothing, Children's Clothing, Historic Textiles 
Framingham Normal School; Massachusetts School of Art; 
B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; Settle- 
ment Worker, House of Seven Gables, Salem, Mass.; In- 
structor of Clothing, Northfield Seminary, East Northfield, 
Mass. 

"Children have more need of models than of critics." 

— Horace Mann. 

MILLICENT M. COSS 
164 State Street, Framingham 

Head of Clothing Department, Instructor in Household 
Arts Education, Historic Textiles 
A.B., Indiana State University; B.S. and M.A. in Household 
Arts Education, Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Begun teaching in State Teachers College at Framingham in 
1914. 

"Never lose an opportunity of seeing anything that is 
beautiful; for beauty is God's handwriting — a wayside sacra- 
ment. Welcome it in every fair face, in every fair sky, in every 
fair flower, and thank God for it as for a cup of blessing." 

— Emerson. 

FLORENCE E. AMIDON 
29 Pleasant Street, Framingham 

Dressmaking, Textiles, Historic Textiles 
Teacher of Dressmaking, Newton Vocational High School, 
Newtonville, and Women's Educational and Industrial 
Union, Boston. 

"A farm or an office are not places to make crops or money, 
but men. All the little things about our daily toil are the 
framework and scaffolding of our spiritual life." 

— Henry Drummond. 

MURIEL CABOT BUCKLEY 
11 Orchard Street, Belmont 

Elementary Clothing, Dress Appreciation, Historic Textiles 
Graduate of State Normal School at Framingham, and of 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 

"To develop in each individual all the perfection of which 
he is susceptible, is the object of education." 

—Kant. 




MAUDE B. GERRITSON 
9 Church Street, Framingham 

English Composition, Literature 
Diploma, State Normal School at Framingham,- B.S. and A.B., 
Teachers College, Columbia University; A.M., Wellesley 
College. 

"The best and most fruitful conception of a university or 
college is the ancient one of a society or guild of scholars 
associated together for preserving, imparting, increasing, and 
enjoying knowledge." 

— A. Lawrence Lowell. 



RUTH H. CARTER 
1 3 Clyde Road, Watertown 

Reading Methods, English, Book Selection 
State Normal School at Framingham; B.S. in Education, Boston 
University. Summer Session: Columbia, Harvard, Boston 
University, London University; M.E., Boston University. 

"May God be with you, and light your candle, — this night 
and all." 

— Mary Well from the book "The Golden Arrow." 








MAY C. TURNER 
75 Maynard Road, Framingham 

Foods 
Diploma, Stout Institute, Menomonie, Wisconsin; B.S., M.A., 
Columbia University; Diploma, Supervisor of Household 
Arts, Teachers Collese, Columbia University; Instructor in 
Household Arts and Critic Teacher, State Teachers College, 
Moorhead, Minnesota, 1919-1927; Instructor in Foods, 
State Teachers College, Buffalo, New York, 1929-1931; 
State Chairman, Student Home Economics clubs, New York 
State, 1930-1931; Assistant Instructor in Foods, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1931-1932,- Instructor in 
Foods, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 
Sessions, 1932-1933; Assistant Critic Teacher in Home 
Economics, School of Rural Education, Cornell University, 
1932-1933. 

"Happiness comes not from the power of possession, but 
from the power of appreciation." 

— H. W. Sylvester. 

LUCILE G. FRENCH 
50 Jackson Road, West Medford 

Head of Household Arts Department 
Diploma, State Normal School at Framingham; B.S., and M.A., 
Teachers College, Columbia University,- Assistant in Science, 
Framingham Normal School; Instructor in Foods, Teachers 
College, Columbia University,- Director of Foods and Nutri- 
tion, James Mi II i ken University, Decatur, Illinois; Instructor 
of Foods, Pine Manor, Wellesley, Mass. 

"If the day and the night are such that you greet them with 
joy and life emits a fragrance like flowers and sweet-smelling 
herbs. . . . is more elastic, more starry, more immortal. . . .that 
is your Success." 

DOROTHY E. WEEKS 
9 Higgins Street, Auburndale 

Foods 
Diploma, State Normal School at Framingham, 1919; Summer 
School, State Normal School at Hyannis; Boston University; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1926; Graduate Study, Columbia 
University. 

"To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield." 

— Tennyson. 




LINWOOD L. WORKMAN 
17 Church Street, Framingham 

Household Physics, Sociology and Social Problems 
A.B., Colby College, 1902; Tufts Summer School of Biology, 
Harpswell, Maine, 1902; Ed.M., Graduate School of Educa- 
tion, Harvard University, 1927; Instructor at Colby Academy, 
Wakefield High, Watertown High; Principal of Higgins 
Classical Institute, Principal of Peters High School, Southboro. 

"Efficiency is a means of getting things rather than of enjoy- 
ing them after they have been secured." 

— Tuttle. 



EMMA A. HUNT 
30 Henry Street, Framingham 

Hygiene, General Science 
A.B., Wellesley College, 191 4 ; A.M., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1925; Summer Session M.A.C.; As- 
sistant Biology, State Normal School at Framingham, 1914- 
1915; Teacher Biology and General Science, Framingham 
High School 1915-1920; Courses, Boston University and 
Alleghany School of Natural History; Member of New 
England Health Education Association, and American Public 
Health Association. 

"Life seems to me not a state of being, but a process of 
becoming." 

— Van Dyke. 





ELIZABETH C. MacMILLAN 

619 North Camden Drive, Beverly Hills, California 

Lunchroom Management, Household Administration, 
Dietetics 
Diploma, State Normal School at Framingham; B.S. at Framing- 
ham; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; Certifi- 
cate, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital; Assistant Dietitian, Massa- 
chusetts State College. 

"The happiness of our life depends upon the quality of 
our thoughts." 

— Marcus Aurelius. 



CORINNE E. HALL 
16 Linder Terrace, Newton 

Household Administration and Practice Teaching 
Diploma, State Normal School, Framingham,- A.M., Teachers 
College, and Special Diploma in Household Arts, Columbia 
University; University of California, Berkeley, California; 
Supervisor of Home Economics, Danbury, Conn.; Teacher 
of Foods, New York City,- Manual Training High School, 
Denver University and Massachusetts State College, Amherst. 

"The habit of looking at the bright side of things is worth 
more than a thousand a year — " 

— Samuel Johnson. 




ANNIE L. D. SWAN 

Matron, Horace Mann Hall 
Diploma, Posse-Nissen School of Physical Education. 

"Square thyself for use,- a stone that may fit in the wall is not 
left in the way." 



FLORENCE I. ROBBINS, R.N. 

120 Main Street, Avon 

Resident Nurse, Instructor of Home Hygiene and 
Care of the Sick 

Diploma, Framingham Hospital. 

"To have done whatever had to be done, 
To have turned the face of your soul to the sun, 
To have made life brighter for one, 
That is to have lived." 

—Old Proverb. 






EVELYN W. KEITH 
Greendale Station, Worcester 

Matron, Instructor of Institutional Management 
Diploma, State Normal School at Framingham; Samaritan 
Hospital, Troy, N.Y.; Teaching, Worcester,- Head Dietitian 
and Instructor at Melrose Hospital; Morton Hospital, 
Taunton,- Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, Concord, N.H. 

"Everyone can do something successfully if he will put 
himself into his work, and go forward steadily and persistently. 
Then the way will be found open for the next step." 

— W. E. Towne. 



MARION A. BRYANT 
9 Dana Street, Cambridge 

Assistant Matron, Peirce Hall 
Diploma, State Normal School at Framingham. 

"To acknowledge our mistakes is not only wise, and marks 
an advance in self-knowledge, but it means self-mastery, 
spiritual victory. When we pull up a weed, we have a clean 
place for a flower." 

— Malthie D. Babcock. 




MILDRED J. IVASKA 
87 Pritchard Avenue 
West Somerville, Mass. 

Principal Clerk 



LILLIAN A. METZGER 

86 Barber Road 
Framingham Center, Mass. 

Junior Clerk 



ELIZABETH M. SHEEHY 
386 West 4th Street 
South Boston, Mass. 

Senior Clerk 



^ 



"THE EFFORTS GIVEN IN TRACING WISDOM'S WAYS, 
GIRD ON THE ARMOR FOR THE COMING DAYS 
OF TOIL AND STRIFE, AND, WHEN THE RACE IS RUN, 
WE SIGH TO THINK THAT WE HAVE SCARCE BEGUN." 



SENIOR CLA55 




MARION SPRING 

President 





EUPHROSYNE GEORGAS 

Vice-President 



WILLIAM H. D. MEIER 

Honorary Class Member 

brighten the corner where you are. 




jS> 7 4jp ^^ 3P ^ m3 

I*. '/-.... M. Jfc w 









iri 


K M 


l Ml 


■ ^ 


1 1 


Ir, 






Rv 








M^i "' ■P 




I ■ ,- 1 


■ ^kJ 


[ 1 




ifl 


$1 


('.< 




.1 


Vtr 








OF 1936 



CYNTHIA KENWAY 

Secretary 




<3fc *lr*«. 





MARGARET BAKER 



T 



reasurer 




DOROTHY LARNED 

Class Advisor 

n est rien d'inutile aux personnes de sens." 

— La Fontaine. 



hllSm 


1<'P*JP< 


:■:; s ■ ■ . ■. . ■ • ■■■■■ 


i 








■ ''■ , ^1 ft y- 




* ( ^r f 




ENGLA ANDERSON 

34 Lawrence Street, Maiden 

Nutrition 
Student Co-operative, Class Representative (3, 4); Gate 
Post Staff (2, 3, 4), Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club 
(2, 3, 4),- Choir (3, 4) ; Athletic Associations (1); May Day 
(2); Usher at Junior Prom,- Chemistry Council (2); Home 
Economics (1). 

"Ever insursent let me be, 
Make me more daring than devout; 
From sleek contentment keep me free, 
And fill me with a buoyant doubt." 



VIRGINIA ANDERSON Ginny 

59 Grove Street, Wellesley 

July 30 

Nutrition 
House Secretary (3); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3, 4); 
May Day Committee (2); Stunt Show (2). 

"The talent of success is nothing more than doing what you 
can do well, without a thought of fame. 





HELEN LOUISE ARCHIBALD Archie 

16 Vaille Avenue, Lexington 

May 27 

Nutrition 
Gate Post Staff (3, 4); Hockey (1, 2, 3) ; Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Captain (1); Volley Ball (1,2); Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4), Manager 
(3); Tennis (1, 2, 3); Fine Arts (3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Secretary (4); Choir (3, 4); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Secretary (2); May Day (2); Usher at Junior Prom (2); Chem- 
istry Council (1),- Stunt Show (1, 2, 3), Committee (4). 

"Dependable, helpful, busy all day, 
Talking and laughing along the way, 
A friend and pal so good and true, 
'Tis hard to find another like you." 



S. DOROTHY ARONSON Dotty 

108 Washington Street, Medford 

November 14 

Nutrition 

House President (3),- Student Government Dance Committee 
(3); Mock Man Dance Committee (4); Fine Arts (4); Harvard 
Cheer Leader (1. 2); Athletic Association (1),- Handbook 
Committee (3); May Day (2); Class Day Committee (4); Stunt 
Show (1, 2, 3), Chairman (3); Home Economics Club (1). 

"As those move easiest who have learned to dance." 




VERONICA CAROLINE BAHLEDA Ronnie 

5 Ashley Street, Westfield 

Au<just 16 

General 
Class and Club Council (3); Basketball (1); Volley Ball (2); 
y. W. C. A. (1); Fine Arts (4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Fine 
Arts Play (2); Athletic Association (1) ; May Day (2) ; Usher 
at Junior Prom (3); Class Day Committee (4); Stunt Show (2); 
A'Kempis (2, 3, 4), President (3), Vice-Chairman of Federa- 
tion (4), Federation Delegate (4). 

"Hospitality sitting with gladness." 



MARGARET JOAN BAKER Mar g e 

1040 Main Street, Melrose Highlands 

September 22 

General 
Student Co-operative (4); President of Horace Mann (4); 
Hockey (1); Basketball (3); Volley Ball (1, 2); Baseball (2),- 
Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); May Day (2); Class Treasurer 
(4); Stunt Show (2) ; A'Kempis (1,2,3,4),- Home Economics 
(1, 4). 

"A friend is a rare book, of which one copy is made." 



MARY RHODA BARNICOAT 

9 Richie Road, South Quincy 

Nutrition 
Dial Staff (4),- Gate Post Staff (4),- Fine Arts (4),- Glee Club 
(1, 2, 3); Choir (3),- Fine Arts Play (1) ; May Day (2),- Stunt 
Show (1, 2, 3, 4),- A'Kempis (4),- Home Economics (1). 

"Individual, attractive, humorous and sweet, 
Happy, sincere, a joy to meet, 
A great big smile, a heart full of fun, 
A loyal friend to every one." 



MARGARET GERTRUDE BAUER Pe 3 

Attleboro, Mass. 

January 10 

General 
Basketball (2),- Volley Ball (2); y. W. C. A. (2, 3, 4); Fine 
Arts (1); Commuters' Association (3); Athletic Association 
(1, 2); May Day (2); Class Day Committee (4),- Home Eco- 
nomics (4); Handbook Committee Chairman (4). 

"Unselfish service is the final test of character." 




^ 



DOROTHY VAUGHN BELL Din g 

45 Goldthwaite Road, Worcester 

General 
Gate Post Staff (2); Basketball (3, 4); V. W. C. A. (4); 
Library Council (2, 4); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3, 4); 
May Day (2),- Chemistry Council (2); Stunt Show (3); Home 
Economics (4). 

"She is pretty to walk with 
And witty to talk with, 
And pleasant, too, to think on." 



MARY JOSEPHINE BENSON Benny 

600 South Street, Roslindale 

March 18 

Nutrition 

Hockey (3); Basketball (4); Volley Ball (2); Baseball (3),- 
Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3, 4); Athletic Association 
(3, 4); May Day (2); Stunt Show (2, 3); A'Kempis (3, 4). 

"Haste thee nymph, and bring with thee 
Jest and youthfull jollity 
Quips and cranks, and wanton wiles, 
Nods and becks and wreathed smiles." 





CATHERINE A. BROSNAN Cathy 

16 Rittenhouse Road, Worcester 

General 
Volley Ball (2) ; Fine Arts (4),- Fine Arts Play (3) ; Stunt Show 
(2); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4). 

"Her voice is ever low and gentle 
An excellent thing in woman." 



MAYDELL EVELYN CHAMPNEY Dell 

17 Smith Street, Taunton 

February 15 

Nutrition 
Student Co-operative Council (4); Basketball (1, 3); Quiet 
and Order Committee (4); Commuters' Association (2, 3); 
Athletic Association (1); May Day (2); Stunt Show (3),- Home 
Economics (1). 

"Who shall silence all the airs and madrigals that whisper 
softness in chambers?" 




MIRIAM STELLA CUTTING Mim 

1443 Hammond Street, Waltham 

March 1 3 

Nutrition 
Commuters' Association (2, 3); May Day (2); Stunt Show (3); 
A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4); Home Economics (1). 

"Trifles make perfection but perfection is no trifle." 



ANNIE F. DAVIS Ann 

38 Shirley Street, Worcester 

June 28 

General 
Basketball (4); V. W. C. A. (4); Commuters' Association 
(1, 2, 3),- May Day (2) ; Stunt Show (3); Home Economics (4); 
Class Gift Committee (4). 

"True happiness 
Consists not in the multitude of friends, 
But in the worth and choice." 



ELINOR MAY DUTTON Dutty 

North Road, Bedford 

August 30 

Nutrition 
Gate Post Staff (4); Dance Committee (3, 4); Hockey (2, 3), 
Captain (3); Basketball (1, 2, 3); Volley Ball (1, 2, 3); 
Y. W. C. A. (1); Fine Arts (4); Athletic Association (1, 2, 
3, 4); May Day (2); Chemistry Council (2); Stunt Show (1, 3). 

"Those who deserve a good character ought to have the 
satisfaction of knowing that they have it, both as a reward and 
as an encouragement." 



HERMALINE FLORENCE GAGE Hinkie 

52 Pearl Street, Amesbury 

September 11 

Nutrition 
Gate Post Reporter (4); Sport Dance Committee (4); V. W. 
C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Secretary (2), Treasurer (3); Quiet and 
Order Committee (1, 2); Stunt Show (1) ; Orchestra (1, 2, 
3, 4). 

"To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield." 




!^i 



BETSY WOOD HALL 

22 Grove Street, Upton 

General 
Fine Arts (1); Glee Club (2, 3) Choir (3). 

"What is originality? It is being one's self, and reporting 
accurately what we see and are." 



JACQUELINE M. HALL Jackie 

2 Albion Place, Newton Center 

March 3 

Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3, 4); May Day Committee (2); 
Stunt Show (2); Home Economics (4). 

"Humour is odd, grotesque, and wild, 
Only by affection spoiled; 
Tis never by invention got; 
Men have it when they know it not." 





HELEN ALICE HARRIGAN 

30 Allston Place, Fitchburs 
April 16 

Nutrition 
Dance Committee (3); Fine Arts Play (3); May Day (2); Usher 
at Junior Prom (2); Stunt Show (2); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4). 

"Oh, bless'd with temper, whose unclouded ray 
Can make tomorrow cheerful as today." 



ELEANOR MacARTHUR KING Eddie 

75 Haywood Street, Greenfield 

Ausust 22 

General 
Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Treasurer (3); Choir (3, 4); Stunt 
Show (1, 2, 3); Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4). 

"It was his nature to blossom into song. 
As it is a tree's to leaf itself in April." 




ELEANOR LACOUTURE La Lackie 

573 Millbury Street, Worcester 

June 28 

General 
Sophomore Representative to Student Government (2); Vice 
President of Crocker Hall (3); Gate Post Assistant Editor (3); 
Y. W. C. A. (3); Chairman of Publicity Committee (3); Di- 
rector of Commuters' Play (2); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 
3, 4); Handbook Committee (3); May Day (2); Chemistry 
Council (1, 2); Library Council (3); A'Kempis (2). 

"Her air, her manners, all who saw admired; 
Courteous though coy, and gentle, though retired; 
The joy of youth and health her eyes displayed, 
And ease of heart her every look conveyed.'' 



DOROTHY LINNEA LINDBLAD Dot 

22 Wyola Drive, Worcester 

September 21 

Nutrition 
Basketball (4) ; V. W. C. A. (4); Commuters' Association 
(1, 2, 3, 4); May Day (2); Stunt Show (3); Home Economics 

(4). 

"A heart as soft, a heart as kind, 
A heart as sound and free, 
As in the whole world you canst find.'' 



RUTH LOVELACE Ruthie 

53 Florence Avenue, Norwood 

General 
Student Co-operative (3, 4); Class and Club Council (3, 4); 
Corridor Councilor (1, 4); Gate Post (3, 4), Editor-in-chief; 
Sport Dance (4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Choir (3, 4); May 
Day (2); Usher at Junior Prom (2); Class Treasurer (3); Stunt 
Show (3); Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4); Senior Prom Committee (4). 

"Worth, courage, honor, these indeed 
Your sustenance and birthright are." 



RUTH ANN LYONS Ruthie 

39 Woodford Street, Worcester 

Nutrition 
Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); May Day (2); Stunt Show 
(2, 3); Commuters' Play (2). 

"Beholding the bright countenance of truth in the quiet 
and still air of delightful studies." 




^\ 



MARIE J. McPHERSON 

3 Penniman Circle, Lowell 
October 6 

Choir (4); Glee Club (4). 

Class of 1921 returned for degree. 

"God sent his singers upon earth, 
With songs of sadness and of mirth, 
That they might touch the hearts of men, 
And bring them back to Heaven again.' 



MILDRED LEONA MAYNARD Millie 

Muschopauge Road, Rutland 

November 2 

General 
Hockey (2, 3); Basketball (2, 3); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Secretary (3); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); May Day (2); 
Stunt Show (1); Home Economics (4). 

"But as smooth and steadfast mind 
Gentle thoughts and calm desires." 





GERTRUDE McPIKE Gert 

423 Mountain Avenue, Revere 

August 21 

Nutrition 
Dial Staff (4) ; Basketball (1, 4); Volley Ball (1, 2); Commuters" 
Association (3, 4); May Day (2); Chemistry Council (4); 
Stunt Show (1, 2); A'Kempis(1, 2, 3, 4); Home Economics (4). 

"What is to come we know not. But we know that what 
has been was good." 



ANTOINETTE DOLORES MINICHIELLO Ann 

13 1-2 Grove Street, Haverhill 

General 
Class and Club Council (4)/ Treasurer of Crocker (3), Corri- 
dor Councilor (3), Music Committee (2); Junior Prom Com- 
mittee (3) ; Sport Dance (4); Volley Ball (1, 2), Captain (2); 
Fine Arts (2, 3, 4), Secretary (3), President (4); Glee Club 
(1, 2, 3, 4), Chairman of Pin Committee (2); Choir (3, 4); 
Fine Arts Play (2, 3, 4); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3),- 
Handbook Committee (2); Tenniquoit Tournament (1); May 
Day (2); Cap and Gown Committee (4); Class Day Committee 
(4); Treasurer of Class (3),- Stunt Show (2, 3); A'Kempis (4); 
Home Economics (1, 4). 

"The comfort of having a friend may be taken away but 
not that of having had one." 




RITA A. MULLIGAN Reel 

3 Cushman Avenue 

September 16 

General 
Quiet and Order Committee (4),- May Day (2); Stunt Show 
(<2, 3); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Home Economics (4). 

"Of all the gifts the gods afford 
(If we may trust old Folly's word), 
The greatest is a friend, who love 
Knows how to praise and when reprove." 



HELEN D. MURPHY Murph 

227 Springside Avenue, Pittsfield 

July 15 

General 
May Day (3, 4); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4); Home Economics (4); 
Stunt Show (2, 4); Student Councillor (4). 

"The place where two friends first meet is sacred to them all 
through their friendship, all the more sacred as their friendship 
deepens and grows old." 



HILDEGARD E. NORMAN OSTERLUND 
40 Grandview Road, Arlington 
December 30 

Nutrition 
Class and Club Council (4); Corridor Councillor (2),- Gate 
Post Staff (2, 3, 4); Publication Dance (2); Hockey (1, 2, 3); 
Basketball (1, 2, 3), Captain (3); Volley Ball (1, 2); Baseball 
(2); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4), CCC representative (3), Presi- 
dent (4); Quiet and Order Committee (1, 2); Athletic Asso- 
ciation (1, 2, 3, 4), Vice President (3), Badminton Manager 
(2); May Day (2); Hostess at Junior Prom (2); Chemistry 
Council (1, 2), Chemistry Assistant (2, 3, 4); Class Day Com- 
mittee General Chairman; Home Economics (1, 4); Orchestra 
(1, 2, 3, 4). 

" My idea is this: 
ever onward." 



MARGUERITE PHILBIN Peg 

Cook Street, Morningdale 

December 27 

General 
A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4); Fine Arts (1, 2) ; y. W. C. A. (4) ; 
Gate Post Staff (4). 

"And now I see with eye serene 
The very pulse of the machine, — 
The perfect woman, nobly planned 
To warm, to comfort, and command 
And yet a spirit still, and bright 
With something of angelic light." 




ELLEN BALLARD REYNOLDS 

102 Pine View Avenue, Worcester 
March 14 

Nutrition 
Judiciary Board (3) ; Y. W .C. A. (3, 4), Vice President (3); 
President of Evening Forum (4); Fine Arts (1); May Day (2); 
Chemistry Council (1); Stunt Show (2); Home Economics 
0,4). 

"Sincerity and truth are the basis of every virtue." 



EDITH L. ROSE 

1 96 Logan Street, Gardner 
May 5 

General 
Student Government Dance (3); Fine Arts (1, 2, 4); Fine Arts 
Play (2); Athletic Association (1); May Day (2); Usher at 
Junior Prom (2); Stunt Show (2); General Chairman of Senior 
Prom (4). 

"To those who know thee not, 
no words can paint 
And those who know thee, 
know all words are faint." 





VIOLA JANE RUGGLES Peggy 

East Main Street, Southboro 

January 25 

General 
Vice President of Crocker (3); Basketball (1); Y. W. C. A. 
(4); Commuters Association (1, 2, 3); Chairman of Commuters' 
Council (4); May Day (2); Stunt Show (2); Senior Prom 
Committee (4). 

"A friend is one who knows all about you but likes you 
just the same." 



GRACE RUSSELL 

32 Maple Street, Norwood 
November 25 

Nutrition 
Dial Staff (4); Gate Post Staff (2, 4), Advertising (29), Social 
Editor (4); Student Co-operative and Gate Post Dance Com- 
mittees (4); Fine Arts (1, 4); Athletic Association (1),- Usher 
at Junior Prom (2); Stunt Show (1, 2, 3, 4); A Kempis 
(1, 2, 3, 4). 

"Oh! to dance all night and dress all day." 



i : $5 




DOROTHY SCHUERCH 

35 Wren Street, West Roxbury 
December 6 

Nutrition 
Class and Club Council (3, 4); Dial Staff, Managins Editor 
(4); Corridor Councillor (2, 4),- Sport Dance Committee (4), 
General Chairman of Dial Dance (4); V. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); 
President (3); Fine Arts (1); Fine Arts Play (1); May Day (2); 
Stunt Show (1 & 2), Chairman (2); Orchestra (2). 

"The heart to conceive, the understanding to direct, or the 
hand to execute." 



MARY LOUISE SCHWEITZER Mitzie 

28 Cross Street, Westfield 

March 19 

General 
Class and Club Council (4); House Treasurer (1); Gate Post 
Staff (4); Sport Dance Committee (4); V. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Quiet and Order Committee (1, 2); Athletic Association 
(1, 2); Class Secretary (2); Home Economics (1, 2, 4), Presi- 
dent (4). 

"A friend may well be reckoned the masterpiece of 
nature." 



ELIZABETH SANDS Bette 

1 7 Old Morton Street, Boston 

January 21 

General 
Vice President of Horace Mann (2); Hockey (1); Fine Arts 
(1, 4), Vice President (4); Quiet and Order Committee (1, 2); 
Play (4); Athletic Association (1, 2); May Day (2, 3); Stunt 
Show (2, 3). 

"She is dramatic, artistic; her nature is cheerful, sunny." 



GALINDIA EDITH SCENA Lindy 

180 Kittredge Street, Roslindale 

November 9 

Nutrition 
Dial Staff Art Editor (4); Dial Dance (4); Hockey (3); Basket- 
ball (4); Volley ball (2); Baseball (3),- Commuters' Associa- 
tion (1, 2, 3, 4); Athletic Association (3, 4); May Day, (2> 
A'Kempis (3, 4). 

"There are persons so radiant, so genial, so kind, so pleasure 
bearing, that you instinctively feel in their presence that they 
do you good, whose coming into a room is like the bringing 
of a lamp there." 



Dot 




MARGARET M. SHOULTZ Shoultzie 

1 43 County Street, Blackstone 

April 21 

Nutrition 
Dial Editor (4); Dial Dance Committee (4); V. W. C. A. 
(1, 4); Fine Arts (1); Commuters' Association (2, 3); May 
Day (2),- Stunt Show (2); Home Economics (4). 

"A good disposition is more valuable than gold; for the 
latter is the gift of fortune, but the former is the dower of 
nature." 



GERTRUDE SOPHIA SJOGREN Gertie 

B Street, Hopkinton 

March 1 

Nutrition 
Hockey (2, 3); Harvard (2, 3); V. W. C. A. (2, 3, 4),- Com- 
muters' Association (2, 3); Athletic Association (2, 3); May 
Day (2); Stunt Show (2, 3); Home Economics (4). 

"Here's to one who loves to do 
The little things of life, 
The happy words, the helpful deeds, 
So tender and so true. 
For those who have no selfish needs 
Also, are all too few." 





MARION SPRING Springie 

15 Columbia Street, Wellesley Hills 

February 2 

General 
Student Co-operative (4); Class and Club Council (4); 
Dance Committee (4); Basketball (4); Y. W. C. A. (4); 
Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); May Day (2); Usher at 
Senior Prom (3),- Class President (4); Home Economics (4). 

" 'Tis something to be willing to commend; 
But my best praise is that I am your friendf." 



LILLIAN FRANCES STONKUS Lil 

3 Vernon Terrace, Worcester 

September 30 

Nutrition 
Basketball (1, 2, 3); Volley ball (1); Commuters' Association 
(1, 2, 3); Athletic Association (2, 3) ; May Day (2); Home 
Economics (4). 



'She is pretty to walk with, 
And witty to talk with, 
And pleasant, too, to think on.' 




ELIZABETH C. SULLIVAN Betty 

6 Spring Street, Bondsville 

General 
Dial Assistant Advertising Manager (4),- Basketball Captain 
(2); May Day (2); Stunt Show (1, 2, 3),- A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Home Economics (4). 

"A faithful friend is better than gold, a medicine for misery 
an only possession." 



MAMIE ALICE VALENTINE 

Cherry Street, Northboro 
September 19 

General 
Hockey (1, 2, 3) ; Basketball (1, 2, 3), Harvard (3),- Volley 
ball (1,2); y. W. C. A. (4); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); 
Athletic Association (3, 4). 

"She's what she is, what better report? 
A girl, a student, a friend, a good sport." 



ANTOINETTE C. WALTHER Tony 

Marshfield, Massachusetts 

General 
May Day (2),- Home Economics (4); Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4). 

"A healthy hunger for a great idea is the beauty and 
blessedness of life." 



MARJORIE LUCILLE WHITTIER Marge 

Monument Street, Wenham 

December 1 7 

General 
Student Co-operative (2, 3, 4), President (4); Corridor 
Councillor (1); Gate Post Staff (4); Student Co-operative 
Dance Committee (2); Junior Prom Committee (3); Chairman 
of Student Co-operative Dance (4); V. W. C. A. (1, 2, 4); 
May Day Queen (2); Usher at Senior Prom (2, 3); Class 
Treasurer (1), President (2, 3); Stunt Show (1, 2). 

"He most lives who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the 
best." 




DOROTHY LOIS WIGNOT Wi gg ie 

61 Summer Street, Natick 

October 1 7 

General 
Hockey (1, 2, 3); Volley ball (1, 2, 3); Y. W. C. A. (4); 
Fine Arts (4); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3),- Athletic 
Association (3); May Day (2). 

"Among good things, I prove and find 
The quiet life doth most abound." 

— John Ray. 



IRJA AGNES WIITANEN 

Chester 
January 20 

Nutrition 
Dial Staff Assistant Art Editor (4); Gate Post Artist (3, 4); 
Basketball (1, 2, 3); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); May 
Day (2); Chemistry Council (4); Stunt Show (3); Class Gift 
Committee (4). 

"I will go any where provided it be forward." 





EVELYN WINSHIP 



Evie 



85 Pearl Street, Stoughton 
July 14 

Nutrition 
Student Co-operative (4); Class and Clubs Funds Assistant 
(3), Class and Clubs Treasurer (4); Gate Post Staff (2, 3); 
Sport Dance (4); Christmas Committee (4); Fine Arts (1, 4),- 
Quiet and Order Committee (1, 2); Commuters' Association 
(4); Athletic Association (1, 2); May Day (2); Usher at 
Junior Prom (2); Usher at Senior Prom (2),- Class Treasurer 
(2),- Stunt Show (2, 3). 

"Grace was in all her steps, heaven in her eye, 
In every gesture dignity and love." 



JENNIE WISOWATY 

48 Medford Street, Chelsea 
April 4 

General 
Commuters' Association (2, 3); A'Kempis (3, 4). 

"A helping hand she is ready to lend 
To anyone, especially a friend; 
Very good hearted, loving and kind, 
A truer friend you'll never find." 



Jen 







EDNA ZALESKI Ed 

1 3 Trenton Street, Lawrence 

December 24 

General 
Class and Club Council (4); Secretary; Basketball (1); Volley 
ball (1); Fine Arts (4); May Day (2); Stunt Show (1, 2); 
Home Economics (1, 2, 3). 

"So well to know 
Her own, that what she wills to do or say 
Seems wisest, virtuousest, discreetest, best." 



A. RUTH KINGMAN 

Wareham, Mass. 
January 1 3 

Class of 1914. Returned for degree. 

"The world means something to the capable.' 



ELLEN FINETTE BROWN Brownie 

Church Street, Cheshire 

February 1 1 

Nutrition 
y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Fine Arts (1) ; May Day (2), Chem- 
istry Council President (4); Stunt Show (1); Home Economics 
(2, 3, 4). 

"To make knowledge valuable, you must have the cheerful- 
ness of wisdom. Goodness smiles to the last." 



ESTHER HOWE 

7 Crandall Street, Adams 
May 11 

General 
Chairman of Library Council (4); Sport Dance (4); Hockey 
(1, 2, 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Harvard (2, 3); Volley ball 
(1, 2),- Baseball (1, 2); Fine Arts (1, 2, 3, 4), President (3); 
Glee Club (3, 4); Choir (4); Fine Arts Play (1, 2) ; Costume 
Chairman (2); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3, 4); May Day (2), 
Costume Chairman,- Stunt Show (2, 4); Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4) 

"Give me work to do, 
Give me health, 
Give me joy in simple things, 
An eye for beauty, 
A mind that reasons, 
A sympathy that understands." 








G. VIRGINIA GIFFIN Ginny 

Dorset, Vermont 

June 30 

Nutrition 
Dial Staff Advertising Manager (4); Gate Post Staff (2, 3); 
Advertising Manager (3); Y. W. C. A. (4); Athletic Associa- 
tion (1); May Day (2),- (Home Economics (3). 

"A helping hand she is ready to lend 
To anyone especially a friend, 
Very good hearted, loving and kind, 
A truer friend you'll never find." 



ELIZABETH CHENEY OLIVER Betty Liz 

"Greenacre," Huntington 

September 22 

Nutrition 
Student Co-operative Vice President (4); Chairman of 
Judiciary Board (4); Corridor Councillor (1, 2, 3); Student 
Government Dance Committee (1, 4), Junior Prom (3), 
C.C.C. Dance (2); V. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4), Cabinet member 
(2, 3),- Fine Arts (1, 2); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, A), Choir (4); 
May Day (2); Usher at Senior Prom (3); Chemistry Council 
(1, 3), Vice President (3),- Class Vice President (2) ; Stunt 
Show (1, 2, 4); Home Economics (2, 3), Vice President (3); 
Class Gift Committee (4). 

"Mine honour is my life, both grow in one,- 
Take honour from me, and my life is done." 




DOROTHY FRANCES PHELPS Dot 

South Street, Grafton 

May 24 

General 
Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); May Day (2); Home Eco- 
nomics (3, 4). 

"Among good things, I prove and find 
The quiet life doth most abound." 



4k 



CHRISTINE ALACH 

10 Grand Street, Framinsham 

Commuters' Association (1, 2); Orchestra (1, 2). 

"In idle wishes fools supinely stay; 
Be there a will and wisdom finds a way." 



Chris 



MARY FRANCES BOND Bondie 

15 Coolidge Avenue, Natick 

June 16 

Class and Club Council (3); Sports Dance Committee (3); 
Hockey (1, 2), Harvard (1, 2, 3), Manaser (2); Basketball 
(1, 2); Volley ball (1); Baseball (1, 2); Tennis (1); Glee 
Club (1, 2, 3), Treasurer (2); Fine Arts Play (1); Commuters' 
Association (1, 2); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3), President 
(3) ; Conference Delegate (3); May Day (1, 2); Stunt Show 
(1, 2),- A'Kempis(1, 2, 3). 

"They love dancing well who dance barefoot." 





ELLA M. BONYMAN Bonnie 

79 Stedman Street, Quincy 

Vice President of Horace Mann (3),- V. W. C. A. (3); Fine 
Arts (1, 2, 3), Treasurer (2), Radio Group (2); Fine Arts 
Play (1) ; Christmas Play (2); Athletic Association (1); May 
Day (1); Stunt Show (1, 2); Senior Prom Committee (3). 

"A loyal friend, sincere and true, 
With a sense of humor and keen mind, too, 
Capable in all she undertakes, 
And of her work a success she makes." 



HILDRED E. BOSTON 

Clinton Street, Hopkinton 

Hockey (1, 2, 3); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3). 

"Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever; 
Do noble things, not dream them, all day long; 
And so make life, death, and that vast forever 
One grand, sweet song." 





DOROTHY ESTHER BROWN Brownie 

1 1 Bedford Street, Concord 

October 22 

Dial Staff (3), Business Manager; Dial Dance Committee (3); 
Volley ball (2); Fine Arts (3); Commuters' Association (1, 2); 
Handbook Committee (1); Stunt Show (2, 3). 

"There is no substitute for thorough going, 
Ardent, and sincere earnestness." 



EDNA CUNNIFFE 

14 Carlton Road, Waltham 

Commuters' Association (1, 2); Athletic Association (1). 

"To those who know thee not, no words can paint, 
And those who know thee know all words are faint." 



RITA GENEVIEVE DORAN 

32 Park Street, Marlboro 

Commuters' Association (1, 2),- A'Kempis (1, 3). 

"Ah, how good it feels, 
The hand of an old friend." 



Chubby 



RUTH ELEANOR DOUGLASS Douggie 

78 Warner Street, Hudson 

August 20 

Class and Club Council (1), Treasurer; Class and Club Coun- 
cil Sport Dance Committees; Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Choir (3); 
Glee Club Operetta (1); Stunt Show (1, 2, 3). 

"Grace was in all her steps 
Heaven in her eye 
In every gesture dignity and love." 




DOROTHY MARIE DILLON Dottie 

67 Depot Street, Milford 

February 4 

Glee Club (3),- Commuters' Association (1, 2); Stunt Show 
(2); A'Kempis(1, 2, 3). 

"Better to be small and shine than to be great and cast a 
shadow." 



CLAIRE A. FOSTER 

Old Connecticut Path, Framingham 
December 26 

Hockey (1, 2, 3), Yale (2); Basketball (1, 2, 3), Yale (3); 
Glee Club (1, 2, 3), Vice President (3); Choir (3); Com- 
muters' Association (1, 2); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); 
Usher at Senior Prom (2), Stunt Show (2). 

"Good humor only teaches charms to last, 
Still makes new_conquests and maintains the past." 





ANNE P. GARVIN 

1 8 Lake Street, Natick 
January 29 

Hockey (1, 2, 3), Harvard (2); Basketball (1); Volley ball 
(1); Baseball (1, 2); Tennis (1) ; Play (1, 2) Commuters' Asso- 
ciation (1, 2),- Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); Stunt (1, 2); 
A'Kempis(1, 2, 3). 

"Happy and carefree all the while, 
Her secret lies within her smile " 



EUPHROSYNE GEORGAS Fro 

664 Worcester Road, Wellesley 
February 8 

Junior Prom Committee (2).- Hockey (1, 2, 3), Captain (2, 3); 
Harvard (1, 2, 3,); Basketball (1, 2, 3); Volley ball (1, 2),- 
Baseball (1, 2); Tennis (1, 2, 3); Fine Arts (2, 3); Glee Club 
(1, 2, 3); Commuters' Play (1), Fine Arts Play (2, 3), Christ- 
mas Play (2), Commuters' Association (1, 2), Vice President 
(2); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); Class Vice President 
(2, 3); Stunt Show (2). 

"A friendship that makes the least noise is very often the 
most useful for which reason I should prefer a prudent friend 
to a zealous one." 




LILLIAN GREENGLASS Greenie 

33 Hasting Street 

April 26 

Hockey (1, 2, 3), Harvard (3); Volley ball (1, 2, 3); Com- 
muters' Play Committee (1); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3). 

"It is better to be faithful than famous." 



ANNE HAGERTY Ha 3 gie 

96 Curlew Road, Quincy 

Junior Prom Committee (2); V. W. C. A. (3) ; Fine Arts (2), 
Radio Group,- Fine Arts Play Committee,- Stunt Show (2); 
A'Kempis(1, 2, 3). 

"Her ready wit and winning smile, 
Her cheery word and helping hand, 
Her aim in life to be worthwhile 
A truer friend you'll never find!" 



FRANCES ANN HALPIN Frannie 

6 Winnemay Street, Natick 

December 1 1 

Hockey (1, 2, 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3); Volley ball (1, 2, 3); 
Fine Arts (1, 2),- Fine Arts Christmas Play Committee (3); 
Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); Athletic Association 
(1 2, 3); A'Kempis(1, 2, 3). 

' Tis not in mortals to command success, 
But I'll do more, I'll deserve it." 



CATHERINE ELIZABETH HARNEY Kay Kasha 

28 Jasset Street, Newton 

April 26 

Dial Staff (3), Hockey (2, 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3), Captain 
(1, 2), Manager (3), Yale (2, 3), Captain (3); Volley ball 
(1, 2), Manager (2); Baseball (1, 2), Captain (1); Commuters' 
Association (1, 2), Treasurer (1); Athletic Association (1, 2, 
3), Board (2, 3); Stunt Show (1, 2),- A'Kempis (1, 2, 3). 



"Life is co-operation with other lives- 
help others to win." 



-we win when we 




ROSAMOND EATON HURLEY Rox 

2 Florence Road, Waltham 

Dial Staff (3); Fine Arts (2); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); 
Gatepost Staff (3). 

"Genius is always impatient of its harness,- its wild blood 
makes it hard to train." 



KARIN L. JOHNSON 

125 Kemper Street, Wollaston 

Dial Staff (3), Art Editor; Gate Post Staff (2); Junior Prom 
Dance Committee (2); Hockey (1, 2); Volley ball (1, 2); 
Baseball (1); Fine Arts (1, 2, 3) ; Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Choir 
(2, 3); Fine Arts Play (2); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3), 
Representative (1); Treasurer, Publicity Manaser; Handbook 
Committee (1); May Day (1); Stunt Show (1, 2, 3); Senior 
Prom Committee. 

"Good humor and senerosity carry the day with the 
popular heart all the world over." 





CYNTHIA REED KENWAY "Cyn" 

22 Walnut Place, Newtonville 

Hockey (1, 2, 3), Harvard (2); Volley ball (2), Commuters' 
Association (1, 
Secretary (2, 3). 



2, 3); Athletic Association (1, 2); Class 



'It's Faith in somethins 
And Enthusiasm for something 
That makes a life worth looking at." 



DOROTHY GERTRUDE KIRBY 

90 South Main Street, Milford 

Commuters' Association (1, 2). 

"With such a comrade, such a friend 
I fain would walk to journey's end.' 



Dot 




RITA LENORE KOHLER "Pook" 

16 Mosgrove Avenue, Roslindale 

June 14 

Dial Staff (3); Volley ball (2); Commuters' Association (1, 2); 
Orchestra (1). 

"Happiness and virtue rest on each other; the best are not 
only the happiest but are usually the best." 



CONSTANCE LEE LINCOLN Cookie, Line 

378 Newton Street, Waltham 

Class and Club Council (2, 3); President (3); Junior Prom 
Committee (2); Student Government Dance Committee (3); 
Hockey (1, 2); Basketball (1, 2, 3); Baseball (1, 2); Tennis 
(1); Glee Club (1, 2); President (2); Chairman (2, 3); Com- 
muters' Association (1, 2); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); 
Class Day Chairman of Music Committee (3); Stunt Show 
Chairman (1, 2, 3); Orchestra (1, 2); Song Leader (1). 

"None knew her but to love her, 
None named her but to praise." 



HELEN AUGUSTA MACE 

25 Riverview Avenue, Waltham 
June 20 

Volley ball (2); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3). 

"Words are easy like the wind 
Faithful friends are hard to find." 



Wii 



MARGARET FALCONER MacLEOD Reg 

10 Hastings Street, Framingham 

July 30 

Junior Prom Committee (2); Hockey (1, 2, 3); Basketball 
(1, 2, 3), Yale (2); Volley ball (1, 2, 3), Baseball (1, 2, 3); 
Tennis (1, 2); Glee Club (3); Commuters' Association (1, 2); 
Athletic Association (1, 2, 3). 

"A good disposition is more valuable than gold; 
for the latter is the gift of fortune, 
but the former is the dower of nature." 




C. JEAN MARSHALL 

25 Herbert Street, Framingham 
July 30 

Basketball (1); Glee Club (2, 3); Choir (3); Quiet and 
Order Committee (1); Play (1); Commuters' Association 
(1, 2); Athletic Association (1, 2); Class Vice President (1); 
Stunt Show (1, 2, 3); Committee (3). 

"A keen wit, a wise look and an answer for everythins." 



CATHERINE A. MacDONOUGH 

58 Hayden Rowe Street, Hopkinton 

Basketball (1), Captain (1); Commuters' Association (1, 2); 
A'Kempis (1),- Athletic Association (1). 

"A helping hand she is ready to lend 
To anyone, especially a friend; 
A truer friend you'll never find." 





LORETTA McGRATH 

14x1> Winemay Street, Natick 

A'Kempis Club (1, 2, 3); Fine Arts (1, 2). 

"Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is 
really a friend." 



VIRGINIA FRANCIS MONDELLO Virgie 

Horace Mann Hall, Framingham 

September 28 

Fine Arts Club (3); A'Kempis (3); Commuters' Association 
(1, 2). 

"Thought means life, since those who do not think do not 
live in any high or real sense. Thinking makes the man." 



^ 




RITA CAROLY MUNDY Mundy 

11 Lawrence Street, Framingham 

Volley ball (1); Commuters' Association (1,2); A'Kempis 
(1, 2, 3). 

"Whatever your hands find to do, that do with all that is 
in you." 



HELEN LOUISE MURPHY Murph 

38 O'Neil Street, Hudson 

March 1 3 

A'Kempis (1, 2, 3); Fine Arts (1); Commuters' Association 
(1, 2); Glee Club (1, 2); Junior Prom Committee (2); Quiet 
and Order Committee (1); Stunt Show (1, 2); Fine Arts 
Play (1); Commuters' Activity (1). 

"A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance." 



RUTH PATRICIA O'MALLEY Pat 

89 Train Street, Dorchester 

May 24 

Commuters' Association (1, 2); Athletic Association (3); 
Usher at Senior Prom (2); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3). 

"To act the part of a true friend requires more conscientious 
feeling than to fill with credit and complacency any other 
station or capacity in social Ife." 



FLORENCE ISOLA PACETTI Flossie 

49 Linden Street, Arlington 

Junior Prom Committee (2); Sport Dance (2); Hockey 
(1, 2, 3); Harvard (1, 2, 3); Volley ball (1); Y. W. C. A. (3); 
Committee for Country Fair (3); Fine Arts (1, 2, 3); Radio 
Group (2); Committee for Christmas Play (2); Athletic 
Association (1, 2, 3); Stunt Show (1); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3). 

"Individual, attractive, humorous, and sweet, 
Happy, sincere, a joy to meet, 
A great big smile, a heart full of fun, 
A loyal friend to everyone." 




ADELINE F. PEAR Peaches 

256 North Avenue, Weston 

January 29 

Glee Club (2, 3),- Commuters' Association (1, 2); Treasurer 
(2). 

"Cheerfulness, sir, is the principle ingredient in the 
composition of health." 



DOROTHY ANNE PERKINS Hepper 

47 Hooker Street, Allston 

March 27 

Dial Staff (3); Hockey (1, 2, 3); Harvard (1, 2); Basketball 
(1, 2, 3); Volley ball (1, 2, 3); Play (1); Commuters" Associa- 
tion (1, 2); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); Handbook Com- 
mittee (1); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3). 

"To be merry best becomes you, for out of question you 
were born in a merry hour." 





BERNICE ESTHER PESKIN 

6 Maple Street, Roxbury 
January 1 5 

"Out of my mean and low ability 
I'll lend you something." 



Bunny 



ROSE PILIBOSIAN Rosie girl 

12 Pine Tree Road, Wellesley 

November 30 

Hockey (1, 2, 3); Harvard (2, 3); Commuters' Association 
(1, 2,) ; Council (3); Glee Club (2, 3); Fine Arts (2); Stunt 
Show (2),- Athletic Association (1, 2, 3). 

"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast, 
To soften rocks, or bind a knotted oak." 



Jfes 




ELSIE RANDALL Els 

876 Worcester Street, Wellesley 

August 16 

Athletic Association (1); Commuters' Association (1, 2); 
Current Events (1, 2, 3); Modern Dance Group (3). 

"In character, in manners, in style, in all things, the supreme 
excellence is simplicity." 



GRACE LILLIAN RANDALL 

West Northfield 

Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); Hockey (1, 2); Basketball 
(2); Volley ball (2),- Stunt Show (1). 

"It is not mirth, for mirth she is too still, 
It is not wit, which leaves the heart more chill, 
But that continuous sweetness, which with ease 
Pleases all around it from the wish to please." 



GRACE L. ROWLAND 

38 Hobson Street, Springfield 

Fine Arts (1, 2, 3); Junior Prom Committee (2),- Choir (3); 
Fine Arts Play (2),- Y. W. C. A. (1, 3); Christmas Pageant (2). 

"The sincere alone can recognize sincerity." 



KATHLEEN ANN RYAN Kippy 

68 Crest Road, Wesllesley 

Class and Club Council (1); Judiciary Board (2, 3); Student 
Government Dance Committee (1); Hockey (1, 2, 3),- Harvard 
(1, 2, 3); Captain (3); Basketball (1, 2, 3); Volley ball 
(1, 2, 3),- Baseball (1,2, 3); Tennis (1, 2, 3); Quiet and Order 
Committee (1, 2,).- Commuters' Association (1, 2); Publicity 
Manager (1); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); Board (2); 
Manager (2),- Class President (1),- A'Kempis (1, 2, 3); Class 
Gift Committee (4). 

"In history, studies, in field and gym, 
She is full of pep and grace and vim; 

In every sport she has been our star — 
Our best to her! May she go far." 




^ 



AMELIA SANTILLI Amy 

87 Tileston Street, Everett 

Basketball (2); Yale (2); Athletic Association (3); Fine 
Arts (3). 

"Purpose, brains, and will — these tell the whole story." 



MARION TAMAO SATO Tami 

194 Franklin Street, Cambridge 

January 1 2 

Corridor Councillor (2); V. W. C. A. (2, 3); Cabinet (2); 
Treasurer (3); Orchestra (1, 2); Librarian (2). 

"Desire not to live long, but to live well; 
How long we live not years, but actions tell." 





ELIZABETH PIPER SHERMAN Betty 

126 Lincoln Street, Newton Highlands 

April 6 

Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3),- Cabinet (2, 3); President of Noon 
Forum (3); Commuters' Association (1, 2). 

"A good disposition is more valuable than gold,- for the 
latter is the gift of fortune, but the former is the dower of 
nature." 



RITA MARIE SMITH 

188 Lincoln Street, Marlboro 

Commuters' Association (1, 2); A'Kempis (1, 3). 

"She's a pal and a friend 
Both good and true, 
A helping hand she'll always lend 
To anyone, especially a friend." 



Smitty 




ANNA M. STEVENS 

34 Morse Street, Waltham 
A'Kempis (1, 2, 3); Fine Arts (1, 2). 

"A constant friend like Ann is a thing rare and hard to 
find." 



CLARA N. WEINSTEIN 

8 Ashton Street, Dorchester 
June 8 

"The shortest answer is doing." 



Kaila 



BEATRICE ANTOINETTE WHITTIER Bea 

76 Hammond Street, Waltham 

December 29 

Glee Club (1); Commuters' Association (1, 2); Open House 
Committee (2); Stunt Show (1, 3). 

"A kind heart is a fountain of gladness, making every- 
thing in its vicinity freshen into smiles." 



ALYCE MARGARET YOUNGSON 

25 Emmons Street, Milford 

Commuters' Association (1, 2). 

"In quietness and confidence shall be your strength. 



Al 




MENTANA GATTI 

23 Imperial Road, Worcester 

"A kindly heart, a loving word 
A little humor now and then, 
A clean and wholesome classmate, 
A friend worth having in the end.' 



ANNE F. GEOGHEGAN Anostasia 

102 Fuller Street, Brookline 

September 1 2 

Junior Prom Committee (2); Hockey (1, 2, 3); Basketball 
(1, 2, 3), Yale (2, 3); Volley ball (1, 2), Captain (1, 2); 
Baseball (1, 2); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3), Delegate to 
Conference (3); Stunt Show (1, 2),- A'Kempis (1, 2, 3), 
Vice President (3), Secretary (2); Business Manager of Senior 
Prom (3). 

"Her glossy hair is clustered o'er a brow 
Bright with intelligence, and fair and smooth." 



MARGARET GLEASON 

81 South Street, Westboro 

"Who has enough, or no more has he need. 



ANNA F. SMITH 

66 Endicott Street, Dedham 

A'Kempis (1, 2, 3); Treasurer (2); Hockey (1, 2, 3); Yale 
(1, 2, 3); Captain (2); Basketball (1, 2, 3); Fine Arts (3); 
Hockey (1, 2, 3); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); Manager 
(3); Gate Post Staff (2, 3); Dial Staff (3); Junior Prom Com- 
mittee (2). 

"Character is the governing element of life and is above 
genius." 






Jte* 



MARY A DALEY— SPECIAL— ELEMENTARY 
82 Green Hill Parkway, Worcester 

"A helping hand she is ready to lend 
To anyone, especially a friend; 
Very good-hearted, loving and kind, 
A truer friend you'il never find." 



EVELYN CHRISTINE AMES 

5 Stanton Avenue, Cochituate 
March 18 

Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); Glee Club (4). 

"How happy to be born and taught, 
That serveth not another's will; 
Whose armour is his honest thought, 
And simple truth his utmost skill!" 



vmesy 



VIRGINIA G. BOUCHER Ginny 

35 Ellison Park, Waltham 

October 1 5 

Class Ring Committee (1); Fine Arts (1); Glee Club (1, 2, 3); 
Vice President (3); Orchestra (1, 2); Choir (1); Concert 
(1, 3); Treasurer of Horace Mann (3); House Councillor 
(1, 2); Junior Prom Committee (2); Harvard Cheer Leader (2); 
Graduation Music Committee (3); Stunt Show (3); Tennis 
(1,2,3). 

"It is not mirth, for mirth she is too still, 
It is not wit, which leaves the heart more chill, 
But that continuous sweetness, which with ease 
Pleases all around it with the wish to please." 





HELEN L. BOYD "A" 

20 Albion Place, Newton Centre 

Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4),- Athletic 
Association (1, 2); Fine Arts (2),- Stunt Show (1, 3); Senior 
Prom Committee (4). 

"Her ivory hands on the ivory keys 
Strayed in a fitful fantasy, 
Like the silver gleam when the poplar trees 
Rustle their pale leaves listlessly 
Or the drifting foam of a restless sea 
When the waves show their teeth in the flying breeze." 



ELEANOR F. BROWN 

153 Chestnut Street, Waltham 

Fine Arts (3); Commuters' Association (1, 2); Basketbal 

"A helping hand she is ready to lend 
To anyone, especially a friend." 



(D. 



MARION DAVIS Socrates 

73 Thatcher Street, Brookline 

April 18 

Dial Staff Assistant Editor (3); Gate Post Staff Faculty Editor 
(2); Assistant Editor (3); Glee Club (2 3); Choir (3); Play 
(1),- Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); May Day (3). 

"Thus would I double my life's fading space,- 
For he that runs it well, runs twice his race." 



ROSALIE MONICA DOLAN Roz 

South Street, Foxboro 

Hockey (1); Basketball (1); Volley ball (2),- Commuters, 
Association (1,2, 3); Stunt Show (3, 4); Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4). 

"Music is the universal language of mankind." 





MARY K. FALVEY Favey 

54 Winslow Street, Cambridge 

Dial Staff Business Manager (3); Gate Post Advertising 
Manager (4); Publication Dance Committee (3); Hockey 
(1, 2, 3), Yale (2, 3, 4); Basketball (1, 2, 3); Volley ball (1); 
Baseball (1, 2, 3); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); Athletic 
Association (1, 2, 3); Usher at Senior Prom (2); Vice Presi- 
dent of Junior Class (2); Stunt Show (3); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4). 

"To have done whatever had to be done 
To have turned the face of your soul to the sun 
To have made life brighter for one 
That is to have lived." 



STELLA R. KAPLAN 

82 Davis Avenue, Brookline 

Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); Stunt Show (3). 
"No gift is more precious than good advice. 



Stell 



^\ 



M. HELEN LANDRY 

38 Faxon Street, Newton 

Junior Prom Dance Committee (2); Hockey (2, 3); Basketball 
(1, 2, 3), Captain (1, 2); Volley ball (1, 2, 3) ; Baseball (2, 3); 
Glee Club (3, 4); Director of Commuters' Play (3); Com- 
muters' Association (1, 2, 3); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); 
Stunt Show (2, 3) ; Orchestra (1, 2, 3). 

"For to cast away a virtuous friend, I call as bad as to cast 
away one's own life, which one loves best." 



MURIEL ANN LARKIN 

21 5 Arsenal Street, Watertown 
June 1 7 

Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3); Hockey 
(1, 2, 3); Volley ball (1). 

"Wisdom alone is true ambition's aim, 
Wisdom the source of virtue, and of fame, 
Obtained with labour, for mankind employed, 
And then, when most you share it, best enjoyed." 





REGINA ANN LEARY Reg 

1 7 Cottage Street, Mansfield 

September 19 

Vice President Horace Mann (3); Handbook Committee (3); 
Class Day Gift Committee (3); A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4). 

"That inexhaustible good nature, which is in itself the most 
precious gift of heaven." 



MILDRED R. MacFARLAND Millie 

Centre Street, Dover 

Dial Staff (3),- Publication Dance Committee (3); Hockey (1, 2), 
Harvard (3). 

"The friends thou hast and their adoption tried, grapple 
them to thy soul with hooks of steel." 



Jfe: 




MIRIAM MARGARET MACUSTY 

1 71 Cherry Street, West Newton 
June 27 

Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3); 
Hockey (1, 2, 3),- Volleyball (1). 

"The heights by great men reached and kept 
Were not attained by sudden flight, 
But they, while their companions slept, 
Were toiling upward in the night." 



HELEN B. McMULLEN Moon 

108 Adams Street, Newton 

Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3),- A'Kempis (1, 2, 3, 4). 
"The most manifest sign of wisdom is continued cheerful- 



ELEANOR C. MEYEROVITZ 

185 Brown Street, Waltham 

Fine Arts (3, 4),- Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3). 

"Good Humor only teaches charms to last 
Still makes new conquests and maintains the past." 



El 



ROSE A. PALADINO Rosie 

8 Martyn Street, Waltham 

Class and Club Council (3, 4); Dance Committee (2),-Hockey 
(1, 2, 3, 4), Captain (1, 2, 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3), Captain 
(3); Volley ball (1, 2) ; Baseball (1, 2, 3); Tennis (1) ; Glee 
Club (2, 3, 4); Choir (3, 4); Plays (3); Commuters' Associa- 
tion (1, 2, 3, 4); Usher at Senior Prom (2); Athletic Associa- 
tion (1, 2, 3, 4),- Publicity Manager (3), Treasurer (2), Dele- 
gate to North Adams (2); Stunt Show (3). 

"Never idle a moment, but thrifty and thoughtful of others." 




MIRIAM ROTHKOPF Mim 

7 Boylston Street, Pittsfield 

May 2 

Dial Staff (4), Assistant Business Manager (4); Gate Post 
Staff Sports Editor (2); Hockey (1, 2, 3); Basketball (2); 
Baseball (1, 2, 3), Manaser (2, 4); Fine Arts (1, 3, 4); Plays 
(1, 3); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3, 4), Board (2, 4); Class 
Day Committee (3); Class Vice President (3); Stunt Show 
(1, 2, 3),- Manager (2); Song Leader (1, 2, 3, 4); Yale Cheer 
Leader (2, 3, 4). 

"Le bonheur semble fait pour etre partage." 



FLORENCE SHARPE Flo 

472 Dedham Street, Newton Centre 

May Day Committee (2); Athletic Association (1, 2); Basket- 
ball (2, 3); Hockey (2). 

"Her ready wit and cheery smile, 
Proclaim to all she's a friend worth while." 





MARY SHARPE 

472 Dedham Street, Newton Centre 
June 12 

Hockey (1, 2); Basketball (1); Volley ball (1); V. W. C. A. 
(1); Athletic Association (1, 2, 3); Stunt Show (1, 2). 

"An ounce of wit is worth a pound of sorrow." 



ANITA L. SHMAUK 

6 York Terrace, Brookline 

Dial Staff Assistant Editor (4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Quiet and 
Order Committee (1, 2); Commuters' Association (1, 2, 3). 

"The only reward of virtue is virtue; the only way to have 
a friend is to be one." 




VIOLA A. THOMPSON Vi 

106 Lexington Street, Auburndale 

Bowling (1),- Tennis (1); Child Study Club (1); Commuters' 
Association (2, 3); Orchestra (1, 2). 

"A kindly heart; a loving word. 
A little humor now and then, 
A true and helpful classmate, 
A friend worth having to the end." 



VIRGINIA HEALEY Jinny 

48 Gorman Road, Framingham 

April 25 

Dial Staff (3); Dial Dance Committee (3); Commuters' Associa- 
tion (1, 2, 3). 

"The incurable itch for writing possesses many.' ' 



EILEEN MARGARET KENNEY 

101 Conwell Avenue, West Somerville 

Hockey (2, 3); Basketball (2); Commuters' Play (2); A'Kempis 
(2, 3, 4). 

"Character is a diamond that scratches every other stone." 



STEPHANIE BARBARA MACORA Bobby 

1 32 Green Street, Clinton 

Hockey (1, 2, 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4); Volley ball (1, 2); 
Baseball (1); Tennis (1, 2, 3, 4); Commuters' Association 
(1,2, 3); AKempis(1, 2, 3). 

"Happy and merry all the day, 
Friendly and jolly in every way 
A helping hand she'll always lend, 
We are proud to call her everyone's friend." 



GRACE M. MANCINI Grade 

78 Crafts Street, Newtonville 

Hockey (1, 2, 3); Basketball (2, 3); Tennis (1, 2, 3); Com- 
muters' Association (1, 2, 3); A'Kempis (2, 3, 4). 

"Patience, persistence, and power to do are only acquired 
by work." 



Jf^ 



<^/Nul:oorapns 



FORMER MEMBERS OF CLASS OF 1936 



JORDON, ANNA M. 
KAITZ, MIRIAM C. 
LODGE, ELLEN R. 
MacARTHUR, ENID L. 
SLAMIN, PHYLLIS M. 



ELEMENTARY 

11 Florence St., Natick 
19 Lyman Terrace, Waltham 
High St., Holliston 
82 Chestnut St., Waltham 
15 Gordon St., Framingham 



HOUSEHOLD ARTS 



ARTHUR, MARGARET W. 
BENSON, FLORENCE LOUISE 
BIXBY, CONSTANCE S. 
CHASE, ADELAIDE L 
CONDON, MILDRED M. 
DAVIS, LUCY A. 
DAWSON, FLORENCE A. 
DERMON, CAROL M. 
DUNBRACK, DOROTHY G. 
EDELSTEIN, MARION 
FINDLAY, FAITH F. 
FOX, ANNA FRANCES 
GRAY, THELMA H. 
HARRISON, ADELAIDE S. 
JOST, MARION E. 
LANGDON, FLORENCE E. 
MODIG, SIGNE D. 
MOLLOY, MARY G. 
OGONNOR, THOMASCINA 
PHILBRICK, KATHARINE 
PIEPER, MARGARET L 
ROBINSON, ORA BERNICE 
RUSH, HELEN BEATRICE 
SONDERMANN, RUTH 
TWOMBLY, CONSTANCE W. 
WATERS, MILDRED LEONE 
WELLS, HELEN GEORGIANNA 
ZANDER, HELEN 
ZIEHMN, HELEN WINIFRED 



Turner Hill, Ipswich 
31 'Clifton St., Worcester 
10 Kensington Park, Lynn 
358 Auburn St., Whitman 

36 Pond St., Randolph 
38 Shirley St., Worcester 
385 Pond Ave., Brookline 
Latisquama Road, Southboro 
67 Lunda St., Waltham 

2 North St., Saxonville 
1 Webster St., Taunton 

37 Winthrop St., Maiden 

1640 Centre St., Newton Highlands 

Old County Road, Westport 

21 Essex St., Framingham 

6 Beech St., Framingham 

Holliston St., Medway 

6 Center St., Auburn 

16 Landon Circle, Lynn 

16 Mt. Bowdoin Terrace, Dorchester 

249 Homer St., Newton Center 

Hardwick 

287 Ashmont St., Dorchester 

27 Moraine St., Jamaica Plain 

Turnpike Road, Southboro 

51 Salisbury St., Winchester 

14 Hadeven Lane, Worcester 

Roslindale 

56 Southbourne Road, Jamaica Plain 










^ •.:'* 



n 








>- ; > 



I 



r" 



OLD FRIENDS 




$&.:., 



"WITH THEM THE SEED OF WISDOM DID I SOW, 

AND WITH MINE OWN HAND WROUGHT TO MAKE 
IT GROW." 



JUNIOR CLA55 




CLA55 Or 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Advisor . 

RARELY SEEN, BUT OFTEN HEARD 

"Where do the Juniors keep themselves? We never see them around/' the 
Sophomores say. 

The Freshmen ask, "Who are the Juniors?" We don't aim to be evasive or to 
keep out of sight, but our activities are very demanding. 

"Where will you find the Household Arts girls?'' you ask. That is easy, drop in 
at Crocker anytime and you may hear such expressions as these — 

"Who drank the orange juice?" 

"Don't give up the shift" 

r 

"Our fathers pay for it." 

"House practice is a 'well-rounding' course!" 

"Windows and lights cleaned today, girls." 

"Do the Household Arts girls stay in Crocker all year?" Oh, no, you find them 
teaching in many near by schools. What fine cooks and seamstresses they are developing! 
Let's tune in on some of their expressions. 

"What, egg sandwiches again!" 



"Every now and then." (We have a visitor.) 
"If I should ever lose you." (Lunch box.) 



Jv § i 






m 







1937 



Evelyn Le Fort 
Dorothy Dowling 
Helen Tomasz 
Dorothy Furbush 
Miss Hazel Nietzold 



"When someone thinks you're wonderful. (Your pupils.) 

"24 Hours a day." (We're professional.) 

"How about the Vocational girls, don't they disappear for nine weeks?" If you 
wish to call it that the Vocationals do disappear for a whole semester. Similar to the 
H. A. girls they teach for nine weeks and dre in house practice for nine weeks. Their 
comments resemble those of the H. A. girls. Here are a few of them. 

"Is the parsley on the table?" 

"What fat in the frying pan!" 

"Don't forget to stretch the dish towels." 

"Did you empty the garbage pail?" 

"There are just the Elementary girls left in the Junior class, do they go out teaching 
too?" Certainly they do. Most of the girls go to the training school to teach for nine 
weeks. Reading lessons, seat work, arithmetic problems, and projects keep them busy 
afternoons and evenings. No wonder they exclaim — 

'If I get an upper grade, I'll die!" 

'Always cutting up." (Pictures). 
Sit on your papers, girls." 

Going home, Going home." (Friday theme song.) 
Shropshire." 
Go into your dance." (1—2— 3— hold.) 



, < -J 



If 



'6 
l 



j : y 



HOUSEHOLD ARTS JUNIOR DIRECTORY 



ANDERSON, RUTH L 
AULD, CAROLINE J. 
BARNICLE, MARION E. 
BILLINGS, DORIS L 
BLACKBURN, EDITH B. 
BRADY, MARIE K. 
BROCKHOVEN, MADELINE 
CARTER, BERTHA W. 
CASE, JOCELYN S. 
CHADWICK, BARBARA E. 
COSTELLO, ELIZABETH 
DANFORTH, FRANCES E. 
DANIELS, ISABEL 
DRAPER, ELEANOR 
EARNSBY, INGEBORG 
ELDRIDGE, HELEN B. 
FRIBERG, ANNA 
FRIEDMAN, ADELE 
HALL, BARBARA 
HAMEL, A. LOUISE 
HIXON, DOROTHY 
HOLT, CECELIA J. 
HORTON, JENNIE E. 
HOWE, HELEN L. 
KNAPP, BARBARA D. 
LeFORT, EVELYN C. 

levinson, doris e. 
mahoney, marion e. 
manvel, frances m. 
martin, evelyn a. 
martin, frances h. 
Mcdonald, marion a. 



439 Cambridge St., Allston 
60 Housatonic St., Lee 
26 Caughey St., Waltham 
29 Elvir St., East Lynn 

21 River St., Northboro 
10 Ludlow St., Worcester 

22 Trescott St., Dorchester 
13 Clyde Rd., Watertown 
County Rd., East Freetown 

51 Francis Ave., West Bridgewater 

260 Pleasant St., Norwood 

Washington St., East Holliston 

Oakham 

69 Ridge Ave., Cambridge 

38 Bancroft Park, Hopedale 

East Dennis 

Belmont St., Westboro 

29 Woodford St., Worcester 

133 Rowe St., Melrose 

3 Assumption Ave., Worcester 
6 Gates Lane, Worcester 

35 Hudson St., Cambridge 
28 Center St., North Easton 

4 Main St., Dalton 

15 Claflin Path, Brookline 

East Dennis 

178 Russell St., Worcester 

31 Clement St., Worcester 

801 North St., Pittsfield 

66 Adams St., Orange 

183 King Philips Rd., Worcester 

22A Main St., Foxboro 



MILLER, ELSIE K. 
MOLLOY, MARY 
MURPHY, A. ELEANOR 
MURPHY, MARY E. 
PATTEN, ROSAMOND N. 
PESKIN, ELEANOR L 
PHILLIPS, EVELYN 
PRICE, MABEL C 
QUEENEY, BLANID P. 
RACICOT, BEATRICE A. 
RAYNES, HARRIET 
RYDER, M. ELIZABETH 
SHERMAN, FRIEDA L. 
SONDERMANN, LOUISE 
SPARHAWK, PHYLLIS R. 
TOMASZ, HELEN L. 
WATERMAN, ELEANOR 
WILSON, RUBY M. 

Special 

LYCETT, MARY E. 



113 Tyndale St., Roslindale 

6 Centre St., Auburn 

19 Wetherell St., Newton Upper Falls 

825 Plymouth Ave., Fall River 

Maple St., Sterling 

6 Maple St., Roxbury 

8 Palmer Ave., Saugus 

56 Massachusetts Ave., Dedham 
Allen St., Scituate 

9 Fifth Ave., Webster 

939 Brush Hill Road, Milton 
552 Andover St., Lawrence 
33 Central St., Marlboro 
27 Moraine St., Jamaica Plain 
47 Stetson St., Whitman 
41 Thompson St., Amesbury 
1795 Highland Ave., Fall River 
71 Central St., Fitchburg 

43 Warner St., Hudson 



VOCATIONAL HOUSEHOLD ARTS 
JUNIOR DIRECTORY 



ALLARD, MARION R. 
BATES, LOUISE T. 
CHASE, HELEN C. 
HILLNER, PHYLLIS 
KESTER, BARBARA D. 
MASON, MABEL D. 
McDERMOTT, VIRGINIA M. 
PRATT, FRANCES 
VALITON, GLORIA E. 



Laurel Way, Huntington 

6 Parker St., Islington 

Common St., Dedham 

1622 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 

174 Austin St., Worcester 

240 Water St., Haverhill 

19 Prospect St., Clinton 

33 Gardner St., Peabody 

55 North St., Fitchburg 



ELEMENTARY JUNIOR DIRECTORY 



ANDERSON, ELLA 
ANGELO, PHYLLIS 
AUCOIN, JEANETTE 
BARROWS, JANET 
BRANI, RITA 
CARPENTER, GENEVRA 
DAVIS, MURIEL 
DOWLING, DOROTHY 
FITZPATRICK, MARIAN 
FURBUSH, DOROTHY 
GAW, ALICE 
GILBOY, RITA 
HUBERT, CORA 
JOHNSON, HARRIET 
KIELY, VIRGINIA 
KREMEN, ELEANOR 
LANDRY, RUTH 
MURPHY, MARGARET 
NAGLE, MARION 
NEWELL, MAUDE 
NIELSON, MARGARET 
NOLAN, HELEN 
PROCTOR, BETTY 
QUINN, DOROTHY 
RANDALL, HELEN 
RIVITZ, SHIRLEY 
SEAGRAVE, GERTRUDE 
SEGAR, LOUISE 
SIBLEY, EVELYN 
SMITH, MARGARET 
SOLOMON, FLORENCE 
STONE, AGNES E. 
THOMPSON, RUTH 
TUCKER, BARBARA 
WIGOD, LILLIAN 
WILCOX, JEANETTE 



c/o Ford Place, Carlisle 

19 Albion St., Somerville 

25 Lowell St., Waltham 

Mendon 

29 Garfield St., Marlboro 

Palmer Ave., Falmouth 

1 Metropolitan Ave., Hopkinton 
330 Lincoln St., Franklin 

47 Williston Rd., Auburndale 

50 Waverley Oaks Rd., Waltham 

46 Bariams St., North Attleboro 

Exchange St., Millis 

115 Broad St., Hudson 

94 Albermarle St., Springfield 

9 Henry St., Lynn 

127 Arlington St., Framingham 

36 Hall Ave., Watertown 

59 Elliot St., Newton Highlands 

Burtch St., Sheffield 

24 Rutland St., Watertown 

12 White Ave., Brookline 

32 Elmwood Ave., Watertown 

216 East Main St., Northboro 

130 High St., Dalton 

5 Lake Shore Rd., Natick 

24 Fuller St., Brookline 

24 Summit Rd., Wellesley 

61 Bay State Rd., Pittsfield 

71 Washington St., Holliston 

771 Salem St., North Andover 

38 Lawrence St., Framingham 

46 Aberdeen St., Newton Highlands 

2 Thayer St., Belmont 
23 Pearl St., Marlboro 

39 Robinhood St., Auburndale 
11 Howard St., Belmont 



w* 




m 











mmrnr 




A SWELL GANG 




CANNOT SAY 




BENEATH THE PRESSURE OF LIFE'S CARES TODAY, 
I JOY IN THESE;" 






SOPHOMORE CLA55 


jttjBBr 






If. [ ■ sj , . ■:'• 






-■■ wtw 


Wb&mL " ^ Ht^I 







CLA55 Or 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Advisor . 



Virginia Crowe 
Marion Jones 
Beverly O'Donneli 
Louise Roycroft 
Miss Arline Poole 



Hp^Ha 



F%~ 



m 






1938 



CLASS MOTTO 

See it, strive for it, stick to it 'till it's done 
That's the class of '38 in earnestness and fun. 

Marion Jones. 

Our Sophomore class here at Framingham is gradually achieving success in college 
life because of the fine spirit of our faculty advisor, leaders, and classmates. 

We know that in every undertaking of human life, whatever we do, whatever we 
make, must, to be successful, conform to the maxims of co-operation and spirit. Yet, 
these alone dxz not enough. There is the "camaraderie" of college life. The joy of 
good-fellowship with a hundred classmates with their respect and friendship make the 
longest and sweetest memories which can never be outlived. 






«*ras*^r 




MAY DAY 



The Class of 1938 chose to present this year a pageant based on the life of the 
Black Prince. Somehow this interesting character has managed to. escape the portals of 
history, possibly due to his father's outstanding ability in directing the country. Early 
in November a group of girls began to secure all available material. With the assistance 
of Miss Cummings and Miss Poole they have written a six act play. 

The Class of 1938 is the first class since May Day was established in 1934 by the 
present senior class to write its own pageant. 

The story is as follows: — 

Edward, the Black Prince, son of the third King Edward of England and his beloved 
wife, Philippa of Hainaut, was born in 1330 on the eve of the outbreak of the long 
conflict between France and England known as "The Hundred Year's War." 

The Black Prince at an early age shows an interest in the arts of war and in his 
cousin Joan. 

Immediately after the ceremony which conveys upon him the title of "Prince of 
Wales," he goes to France to win his spurs. On the battlefield of Crecy he distinguishes 
himself for his valor and upon his return is invested with the Order of the Garter which 
institution is inaugurated by his father in celebration of the victory over the French. 

The Black Prince tries to do his friend, Lord Brocas, a good turn by interceding for 
him with his cousin Joan now grown to be a beautiful young woman — "The Fair Maid 
of Kent." 

The Black Prince discovers that he loves her and he forces her reluctant confession 
of her love for him. The bethrothal is brief for within a few moments war in France again 
calls Edward. The Archbishop of Canterbury marries them and they depart for France. 

The English are again successful and when the French soldiers leave, the besieged 
city of Calais, long starving, is left defenceless. Edward offers to free the citizens upon 
receiving six hostages. Phillippa intercedes for the lives of the six starving men and they 
too receive their freedom. In the midst of this happier moment the Black Prince collapses 
and dies. 

Later, in England, Edward III worn out by cares of state and the loss of his wife 
and son dies as Richard II son of the Black Prince is proclaimed King by the nobles who 
kept vigil. 



COMMITTEES 



General Chairman 
Dancing 
Director . 



VIRGINIA CROWE 

MISS TAYLOR 

MISS KINGMAN 



Pageant 


Casting 


Costumes 


Programs 


Scenery 


A. Lemek 


E. Vuill 


M. Schneider 


E. Stensby 


K. Foster 


J. Homer 


V. Reed 


H. Walker 


L. Roycroft 


A. Ballentine 


G. Clark 


B. Newton 


L Valentine 


G. Corea 


P. Horton 


M. Schneider 


1. Momian 


H. White 


P. Lawton 


H. Nickersor 




D. Froeberg 


D. DeVenne 
C. Boothby 
L. Reese 


K. Long 


D. Rowse 



Dancing 

C. Maddax 
M. Campbell 
G. O'Donnel 
I. Davis 
F. Wetmore 



Chapel 

E. Feerick 
O. King 

F. Clark 

J. Zinkowski 
J. Wolfe 



Refreshments 

A. Gricius 

D. Logiodice 

E. Hoffman 
M. Guilfoyle 
H. Stenberg 
L. Anderson 



HOUSEHOLD ARTS AND VOCATIONAL 
SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY 



ANDERSON, LINNEA 
BALLENTINE, AVIS E. 
BOOTHBY, CLARA 
BURR, MARJORIE 
CAMPBELL, MARY C. 
CASHNER, HARRIET 
CHARKO, HARRIET 
CLARK, FRANCES M. 
CLARK, GLADYS G. 
CONDON, RUTH 
COREA, GENOVEFFA 
COX, CHRISTINE 
CROWE, VIRGINIA 
DAVIS, INEZ 
DEVENNE, DOROTHY 
FEERICK, ELEANOR 
FOSTER, K. ELIZABETH 
FRANKEL, BEATRICE 
FRAZIER, ADRIENNE 
FROEBERG, DOROTHY 
GIBBS, ELIZABETH 
GOODMAN, GERTRUDE 
CRICIUS, ALDA 
GUILFOYLE, MARGARET 
HOFFMAN, EVELYN 
HOMER, JANE 
HORTON, PRISCILLA 
JONES, MARION 
KING, OLIVE 
KINGSBURY, PRISCILLA 
LAWTON, PHYLLIS 
LEMEK, ANNA 
LOGIODICE, DELLA 
McCAULEY, MARY 
McNEIL, DORIS 
MILLER, HELEN 
MOMIAN, ISABEL 
NEWTON, ELIZABETH 
NICKERSON, HARRIETT 
O'DONNELL, GRACE 
O'DONNELL, MARY 
REED, VERA 
REESE, LILLIAN 
ROWSE, DOROTHEA 
ROYCROFT, LOUISE 
SCHNEIDER, ALICE MARGARET 
SCHNEIDER, MYRTLE 
STENBERG, HILDA 
STENSBY, ESTHER 
VALENTINE, LUCY 
WALKER, HELEN 
WETMORE, FRANCES 
WHITE, HARRIET 
WOLFE, JANE 
YUILL, EDITH 
ZINKOWSKI, JENNIE 



34 Lawrence St., Maiden 

104 Dale St, Dedham 

26 Woodlawn St., Randolph 

176 Marked Tree Rd., Needham 

115 Ward St., Worcester 

42 Brantwood Rd., Worcester 

34 Sterling St., Worcester 

1478 Park St., Attleboro 

354 Broadway, Lynn 

25 Colburn St., North Attleboro 

24 Atherton Ave., Roslindale 

Concord St., Holliston 

46 Central Ave., South Braintree 

1 Metropolitan Ave., Hopkinton 

15 Boyonton St., Waltham 

24 Woodbine Ter., Auburndale 
1 Withington St., Westminster 
389-Trafton Rd., Springfield 
1774 Columbia Rd., Boston 
81 Hillberg Ave., Brockton 
49 Burdett Ave., Framingham 
10 Tahanto Rd., Worcester 

16 Fossdale Rd., Dorchester 

24 Home St., Worcester 

1601 Centre St., Newton Highlands 

170 Whitmnarsh Ave., Worcester 

2280 Washington St., Canton 

110 Metropolitan Ave., Roslindale 

Curve St., Millis 

5 Curve St., Medfield 

136 North St., Foxboro 

45 Mendon St., Uxbridge 

681 East Fourth St., South Boston 

58 Water St., Marlboro 

Mill St., Framingham Center 

20 Sterling St., Worcester 

16 Elizabeth St., Worcester 

165 Central St., Auburn 

Barcl iff Ave., Chatham 

315 Salisbury St., Worcester 

282 Highland St., Worcester 

Main St., Orleans 

78 Belvidere Ave., Holyoke 

Old Billuria Rd., Medford 

87 Hollingsworth St., Mattapan 

10 Sherbrook Ave., Worcester 

25 Cherry St., Hudson 

15 Arborogh Rd., Roslindale 

3 Bedford St., Concord 

62 Pleasant St., Framingham Center 

51 Marblehead St., North Andover 

8 Underwood St., Worcester 

7 Fenwood Rd., Worcester 

28 Claffin St., Milford 

39 Glendale St., Easthampton 

23 Fernboro St., Roxbury 




\V/ W/ I \V/ D 




"AND LOOKS COMMENCING WITH THE SKIES 
THY RAPT SOUL SITTING IN THINE EYES." 



FRESHMAN CLASS 




CLA55 OF 



President Meave Sullivan 

Vice President Louise Osborne 

Secretary _ -. Charlotte Sherrill 

Treasurer Thelma Jarisch 

Faculty Advisor Miss Maude Gerritson 



n 



& IB 




W .'* 



^ 



THE SPIRIT OF '39 



ow, with all this outward show, 






n. 






HOUSEHOLD ARTS AND VOCATIONAL 
FRESHMEN DIRECTORY 



AHTIO, PAULA V. 
AMMIDOWN, BEATRICE M. 
BARTLETT, REBECCA E. 
BATTEY, EDITH 
BEAN, MARJORIE T. 
BESSE, MARJORIE E. 
BINGHAM, MARGARET R. 
BRYANT, ELLA E. 
BURGOYNE, MARJORIE S. 
BURKETT, MARY V. 
CARLISLE, CAROLINE E. 
CARROLL, HELENE E. 
CHAFFIN, RUTH E. 
CHAOUSH, DOROTHEA E. 
CHOUINARD, LOIS E. 
CODYER, ELIZABETH M. 
CONZA, MANUELLA 
COTE, BERNICE E. 
CROWN, ARLINE L 
DANAHY, RITA C 
DAVENPORT, PHYLLIS E. 
DICKINSON, RUTH 
DUNTON, LEAH M. 
EGGERS, GLORIA C. 
FISKE, MABEL A. 
FRIEDMAN, JUDITH 
FULLER, DOROTHY E. 
GOLDEN, IRENE M. 
GOLDTHWAITE, ELEANOR L. 
GOODFIELD, ALICE S. 
GRAY, MARGARET L 
GUARGNA, LUCILLE M. 
HANLEY, ALICE 
HASSELMANN, HENRIETTA L. 
HAVEY, FRANCES E. 
HERSEY, ALMA M. 
HIGGINS, MARY M. 
HORGAN, ALICE G. 
JARISCH, THELMA C. 
JOLIKKO, EDITH S. 
KELLOGG, FLORENCE B. 
KERRIGAN, MARY V. 
KIMBALL, GERTRUDE 
KNIGHT, MARGUERITE B. 
KOLODZIEJ, GENEVIEVE S. 
LARNER, MADELINE 



268 Central St., Gardner 
151 Riverside Drive, Dedham 
92 Coburn Ave., Worcester 

1093 Washington St., South Braintree 

137 Woodlawn St., Springfield 

Cor. E. Central and Onset Ave., Onset 

Hardwick 

29 Clairemont Park, Boston 

South St., Northboro 

83 Hawthorne St., East Weymouth 

167 Warren Ave., Wollaston 

43 Virginia St., Springfield 

21 Brighton Rd., Worcester 

28 Andrews St., Springfield 

B. St., Hopkinton 

100 Pine St., Waltham 

28A Shorey St., Lynn 

Oak St., Grafton 

Main St., Wamesit 

Cedar St., Hopkinton 

Creeper Hill Rd., North Grafton 

70 Dennison Ave., Framingham 
19 Grove St., Milford 

11 Hampshire Rd., Framingham 

75 School St., Manchester 

158 Morningside Rd., Worcester 

R. F. D. No. 1, Lowell 

177 Sandwich St., Plymouth 

Pleasant St., Dunstable 

Gilbertville 

Ash St., Hopkinton 

35 Van Winkle St., Holliston 

71 Coburn Ave., Worcester 
130 Fairmount Ave., Worcester 
4 Archdale Rd., Roslindale 
Box 575 Hopedale (Mendon) 
200 Walnut St., Holyoke 

185 Highland St., Worcester 
118 Fountain St., Springfield 
6 Squam Rd., Rockport 
34 Cleveland St., Arlington 
781 Hanover St., Fall River 
3 Sacramento Place, Cambridge 
364 Lincoln St., Marlboro 
344 Washington St., Haverhill 

269 North St., North Weymouth 



LEWIS, CONSTANCE E. 
LOVETT, MARGARET T. 
LUCE, CAROLYN A. 
MACKIE, EVELYN F. 
MclLVENE, LOUISE 
MERRILL, LODEMA A. 
MICKELSON, CLARA E. H. 
MORTIMER, CLAIRE E. 
MURRAY, JANE 
NOURSE, MARION 
O'CONNOR, MARGARET 
ORAM, PHYLLIS 
OSBORNE, LOUISE 
PALMER, JEANETTE 
PARMENTER, BEATRICE D. 
PHELAN, PHYLLIS F. 
PIKE, ELEANOR F. 
RADOVSKY, CLAIRE P. 
RIDDER, ELEANOR S. 
RODGER, MARTHA E. 
SEELEY, ELIZABETH M. 
SEVRENS, ELIZABETH M. 
SHERRILL, CHARLOTTE W. 
SMITH, MARJORIE B. 
SMITH, ROSEMARY J. 
SMITH, SHIRLEY J. 
STOTT, EDITH C. 
TEAHAN, RUTH E. 
TEBBETTS, MARY E. 
THOMPSON, SHIRLEY 
TORRANCE, MARIE L. 
TRIBE, DOROTHY L 
TUCKER, LESLIE M. 
WAITZ, ESTHER 
WEEKS, KATHERINE N. 
WHITE, ELEANOR D. 
WHITE, JEAN 
WHITING, ELEANOR D. 
WHITNEY, CATHERINE H. 
WHITTEMORE, LOUISE 
WILCOX, PHYLLIS L. 
WILD, RUTH E. 
ZEPP, ANITA D. 



King St., Falmouth 

Main St., Hatfield 

Dalton 

163 Cambridge St., Fall River 

86 Cedar St., Braintree 

Francis St., Lunemberg 

Old Common Rd., Millbury 

28 Brent St., Dorchester 

36 Bower St., West Medford 

Sterling Junction 

11 Beechmont St., Worcester 

45 Kenneth St., West Roxbury 

271 Lowell St., Peabody 

74 Commodore Rd., Worcester 

91 Newton St., Marlboro 

Pine Swamp Rd., Ipswich 

40 Cranberry Rd., Weymouth 

1316 Highland Ave., Fall River 

Oak St., Whitman 

10 Medway St., Dorchester 

23 Bowditch Rd., Jamaica Plain 

10 Milk St., Nantucket 

16 Downing St., Brookline 
9 Fruit St., Milford 

441 Holmes Rd., Pittsfield 

Chilmark 

403 North Main St., Andover 

57 Nonotuck St., Holyoke 

81 Ellison Park, Waltham 

32 Cedar St., Gardner 

Plainfield 

7 Winslow Court, Fairhaven 

Carney St., Uxbridge 

Boston Rd., Billerica 

Williams Ave., Barre 

Acushnet Station, New Bedford 

9 Hancock St., Aubumdale 

56 Mill St., Worcester 

48 Forest St., North Brookfield 

47 Worcester Lane, Waltham 

17 Nanset Rd., North Weymouth 
529 Walnut St., Fall River 

177 Metropolitam Ave., Roslindale 



ELEMENTARY FRESHMEN DIRECTORY 



AIKEN, ELEANOR E. 
BLYTH, CATHERINE M. 
BULLARD, ELIZABETH K. 
BYRNES, RUTH E. 
CARLE, BARBARA 
CAVANAUGH, RITA 
CHURCHILL, HELEN G. 
DELANEY, PATRICIA W. 
ELLIS, CATHERINE M. 
EMERY, ELIZABETH P. 
EPSTEIN, ALICE 
ERLICK, FRANCES M. 
FELDMAN, RUTH 
FITZGERALD, ELEANORE M. 
GAGE, ANNA R. 
GARLAND, RUTH C. 
GIBBS, ALICE A. 
GIBBS, ELIZABETH P. 
GUNN, ANNA M. 
HARTNETT, EILEEN E. 
HEMINGWAY, RUTH A. 
KONETZNY, MARGARET M. 
LAMB, LEVONA T. 
LONG, DOROTHY 
LYNCH, MARGARET M. 
LYONS, KATHLEEN R. 
MacLEOD, MARGARET F. 
McKEON, MARION 
McMANUS, LOUISE M. 
MORRILY, MARY F. 
NELSON, EMMA H. 
NOVICK, BELLE 
OLIVER, INEZ 
O'NEILL, ELLEN M. 
PEASE, ELVIE W. 
PETTINGELL, PRISCILLA 
RICKER, MABEL A. 
RUSSO, MARIE R. 
SCHOLL, MYRTLE A. 
SHORT, MARY F. 
SULLIVAN, MEAVE T. 
VOUDOURIS, MARY C. 
WESTERGREN, LILLIAN S. 
WHITE, RITA I. 
WHITTEMORE, ARLENE 
WILLIAMS, FERN E. 



42 Whitfield Rd., W. Somerville 
312 Center St., Newton 

54 Gould St., Walpole 
116 Danforth St., Saxonville 
27 Cross St., West Newton 
697 Washington St., Dedham 
Whitney St., Northboro 

23 Linden Place, Dedham 

9 Orange St., Nantucket 

3 Winthrop St., Winchester 
19 Melvin Ave., Brighton 
27 Wilcock St., Dorchester 
263 Irving St., Framingham 
42 Cottage St., Hudson 
Brewster 

111 Washington St., Wellesley 
35 Commonwealth Rd., Cochituate 
49 Burdett Ave., Framingham 
38 Carleton St., Newton 

7 Vesta Rd., Wellesley 

R. F. D. No. 1 Framingham 
35 Claredon St., Newtonville 
1 Woodman Ave., Haverhill 
Highland St., Holliston 

55 Essex St., Marlboro 

87 Maynard St., Roslindale 

10 Hastings St., Framingham 
980 Main St., Worcester 

8 Irving Rd., Weston 

102 Alexander St., Framingham 

4 Mendon St., Upton 
/Willis 

1135 Commonwealth Ave., Allston 

727 Parker St., Roxbury 

7 Mechanic St., Monson 

62 School St., Dedham 

45 Bennett St., Hudson 

176 Dedham St., Newton Highlands 

6 Morse St., Natick 

6 Greymere Rd., Brighton 

9 Clark St., Brookline 

22 Strathmore Rd., Brookline 

Wellesley 

40 Mellon St., Framingham 

149 Hillside Rd., Watertown 

106 Speen St., Natick 




"THE MOVING FINGER WRITES; AND, HAVING WRIT, 
MOVES ON:" 



SENIOR BIOGRAPHY 







IVY WHISPERINGS 



Don t look now," whispered the young ivy on the college wall, the gay 
frivolous one with the wreath of scarlet leaflets in her hair and the curling 
tendrils that were always nodding toward her companions as she smiled and 
danced in the warm September sunshine, "but isn't that the first of the new 
freshmen to arrive on the campus?" 

The older ivy, from her more lofty position on May Hall, inclined her head 
slowly in a condescending glance at the gawky girl who stumbled up the front 
walk, her toofull suitcase banging against her shins as she eagerly stared at the 
campus that was to be her home for the next three years. 

Hmm, so it would seem," answered the ivy, with a yawn. "Oh, well, 
just another class to overrun the college," whereupon she returned to her all 
important task of attempting to reach beyond the third floor window ledge. 

But the young ivy only smiled and danced all the more gaily, for she had 
overheard the freshman exclaim, "What a beautiful campus! Just look at the 
sunshine slanting on that gorgeous crimson ivy! Oh, I know I'm going to love 
Framingham!" 







That week, the ivy saw more freshmen on the campus, bobbing in and out 
of doorways,- for even if they hadn't been asking too many questions, it would 
still have been easy to identify them by the huge oilskin bibs which they wore 
around their necks. Plainly visible in bright green letters, each freshman's 
name and home town was printed on her bib, an initiation gift from the 
Seniors of '34. 

The ivy saw them again, preparing for the Freshman Tea in the assembly 
hall, where teachers (of all people!) assisted as ushers. She heard them talking 
about their first class meeting, when Kay Ryan was elected President, with Jean 
Marshall, Evelyn Le Fort, and Barbara Knapp assisting her in guiding the class 
as vice-president, secretary, and treasurer respectively. She saw them launch 
the Commuters' Current Events group, there to carry on many a spirited dis- 
cussion during Monday noon lunch periods with the mentally-invigorating 
Sarah S. Cummings. She overheard their enthusiastic accounts of the Field Day 
at the Nickerson grounds in Auburndale, where they first distinguished them- 
selves along athletic lines in their baseball game against the faculty, although 



their performance was somewhat eclipsed by the stellar play of the truly 
versatile Miss Larned and Dr. Meier. She saw them getting ready for their 
first dance at the college, the Student Government Semi-formal, held in May 
Hall for freshmen and the rest of the lower classmen. She saw them at their 
first Harvard-Yale week-end, just a little bit uncertain and undecided as to 
what it was all about, but determined nevertheless to join in the spirit of the 
fun if not in the actual combat. 

She listened with the rest of the ivy for the decision of the judges at the 
Annual Song Contest in January, and was not surprised to see the freshmen 
walk off with first prize for Helen Chase's never-to-be-forgotten song, "Come 
Freshmen, Come Sophomores, Come One and Come All!'' She saw the three- 
year elementary girls at their stormy class meetings in the spring, trying to decide 
whether they would enter the sophomore class and work with their household 
arts friends for another year, or whether they would make the break now by 
joining the girls who were to be their graduating classmates of '36. In the end, 
reason triumphed over sentiment, and the ivy saw them elect as officers for the 
new junior year: President, Marjorie Whittier; Vice-President, Ephrosyne 
Georgas; Secretary, Cynthia Kenway,- and Treasurer, Ruth Lovelace. Later, 
when Miss Lovelace was made Editor of the Gate Post, Anne Minichello 
succeeded her as custodian of the treasury. 

The little ivy danced and grew taller during the summer, while many of 
her former freshman friends worked and grew older. But she was there smiling 
in the September haze when they returned — a trifle less inquisitive — for their 
junior year. This time she knew it was their turn to defend the freshmen against 
the Seniors, which they did in masterly fashion at the freshman court trial, even 
going so far as to cheer unrestrainedly for the freshies who refused to break 
under the discipline of the cruel, cruel seniors. Later she saw them going into 
the wholesale stationery business, electing Marie Schweitzer as chairman of 
the committee to see that letters from college had the chance to be written on 
official "Framingham" note-paper. 

From the talk that she heard on all sides, she realized that to these girls 
the most important event of their junior year was their first period of cadet 
teaching in the schools. She knew how eager they were to get into a class- 
room of their own, to have a chance to try out some of the theory with which 
they had been indoctrinated for the past year and a half, and, more important 
still, to experiment a little with some of their own pedagogical ideas, up until 
now purely embryonic in nature. She saw them race back Mondays for con- 




-'*-.* Z'J 

















$m 






ferences with the inspiring Miss Rochefort, heard them offer shy confidences in 
the little office in Wells Hall, and realized that they were gaining much of 
value from their work in the schools, much that neither college nor study, 
faculty nor textbook could ever hope to offer. 

In the spring, the little ivy alone knew what started the fire on college 
hill, but she refused to tell. She knew, however, that now her friends would 
have one more item for their college diaries, the building of the new class- 
room and administration hall which would be commenced during their senior 
year at college. She missed their Monday meetings and chapel gatherings 
for a while, since they were held beyond her range of vision in the dining 
room at Peirce Hall. 

In May, the ivy saw them elect B. U. s popular Lil Sundin, (loaned for 
one year to Framingham) as chairman of the Junior Prom, and later heard them 
discussing the unprecedented success of the affair. "Pooh," remarked the 
older ivy, "as if every class didn't have Junior Proms! Just listen to them talk!" 

The young ivy smiled in silence, however, for she had caught a glimpse of 
some of the dancers as they strolled through patches of moonlight, and she 
knew that the stars in their eyes were no less bright than the stars in the sky, the 
laughter in their voices as it floated out through the French windows no less 
musical than the rustling of the soft night air through the leaves of the Japanese 
maple on the lawn. 

She wondered a little about them during that second summer. Would 
they change much, those gay, enthusiastic young students who had shown 
such signs of promise upon their arrival? She was almost a bit afraid at their 
return in the fall, and scanned their faces attentively for any signs of change. 
Older they were, to be sure,- quieter perhaps,- a little less curious and argu- 
mentative/ but still with the same spirit of independence, the same display of 
youthful initiative, the same enthusiasm for life that had carried them through 
the first two years at school. 

Again she watched them reap new laurels in field and classroom, heard 
of their fun at Stunt Night, when their show was directed by the ever-capable 
Connie Lincoln, and was thrilled along with them at the talk of their first 
"off-campus" dance, the important Senior Prom, planned and successfully 
carried out by Edith Rose, with the help of Ella Bonnyman, Anne Geoghegan, 
Helen Boyd, Ruth Lovelace, Karin Johnson, and Viola Ruggles. 

She saw them, more matured and more poised now, returning from their 



last cadet teaching period, heard them practicing their songs for Class Day 
and Graduation, saw them preparing for their college finals, and, a little later, 
watched them file for the last time down the walks of the campus. 

"There they go," snorted the older ivy, "that same class we watched enter 
the college three years ago! Just listen to them sing. Yet what have they done 
that other classes before them haven't done? Bah! The conceit of all graduates! 

"Now this is real achievement, she added, peering down from her new 
peak atop the third floor window. Look how much I've grown since they 
entered.' 

But the young ivy only smiled and continued to dance in the warm June 
sunshine, for she knew that their eagerness, their zest for life, their inspiration 
had withstood the test of three years' struggle against the traditionalism of 
college life, and that these girls of 36 were going out from Framingham with 
heads held high, their youthful hopes and ideals tempered, strengthened, and 
enriched by their life there on the hill. So, as she nodded to her companions 
on the old brick wall, she rustled her fresh green dress and whispered, "They'll 
make us proud of them all some day; wait and see.'' 

Rosamond Hurley. 










1 



(2LA55 HISTORY 



Time and tide wait for no man" we are told, and without questioning 
we accept the truth of the expression. However time, as such, is endowed 
with a kaleidoscopic nature which presents a variety of scenes to the eye, the 
scene being dependent upon the mental perspective of the individual. Antici- 
pation persistently enlarges time beyond all belief, while a retrospective glance 
shows time far more brief and swift moving than it ever appears while it is 
what we term the present. How long ago it seems since we, the class of 1936, 
were as a group, a non-existent entity and yet, how short the time seems since 
we became acquainted and were welded together to form the group we now 
arel Oh, for the life of a freshman! 

It may have been a life filled with rash promises, harsh judgments, and 
incomplete conclusions, but it certainly must have had worthy elements in its 
composition, for have we not for four successive years returned to work toward 
the ultimate fulfillment of some of those promises? We were students at an 
accredited State Teachers College, and many the poor unfortunate who was 
laughed to scorn at the mention of "the Normal School." Alas, the bitter must 
come with the sweet, and what was our delight to learn of the introduction 
of a regular mid-year examination period with its attendant two hour exams. 
We had, however, been duly mpressed by the dignity of seniority in a series 
of activities; initiation with its black gym stockings and detested black berets, 
the Senior-Freshman Reception and last but not least the ceremony of the in- 
auguration of caps and gowns, so that mid-year exams, though somewhat of a 
bugaboo were classified as mere minor difficulties on the road we had chosen 
to follow. In a manner since found to be typical of college years, such diffi- 
culties in the end were practically forgotten or overshadowed by the social 
events which were sprinkled sparingly through the college calendar. When for 
the first time we met as a class for the election of officers, the attitudes of the 
individual members of the class certainly were prophetic of things to come. A 
group of leaders confident of their ability to carry out any program entrusted to 
them, a group not quite so sure but ready to try, and a large group positive of 
their inability to lead anything gives a mere approximation of the composite 
elements in the class. We made no mistake however in our choice of officers 
as was shown by their capable workmanship. Thelma Gray, President; Isabel 
Lynch, Vice-President,- and Doris Maynard, Secretary are all ex-members of our 
class now, but Marjorie Whittier, Treasurer, of the class in that far off year has 
remained with us through the years. 

Our real initiation into the true spirit of Framingham came with the arrival 
of Harvard-Yale Weekend. Weekend of weekends! Somehow the spon- 
taneous enthusiasm of Lettice Mitchell, one of the impressive upperclassmen, 
was contagious as far as we were concerned, and were we glad of it when 
the weekend was only a matter of past history! The year all too soon was 
ended and all the vicissitudes of freshman clothing and chemistry were merely 
hurdles we had successfully cleared. 

From the heights of our added stature, we returned to take the second year 
in the momentum of our swing and found that against the joys of a f eshman 
the trials and tribulations of a sophomore took on skycraper effects. We had 
pattern drafting and matching problem moments, but then, too, we found time 
to capture the coveted numerals with our Stunt Night Parade. Oh, and do you 



remember the hours we spent on sophomore chem? The hours we spent with 
thee, dear heart! And yet, the spirit of idealism deeprooted in the group, rose 
in open revolt against the lack of intellectual integrity shown in the matter of 
chem exams and the honor system. The Sophomore Creed, now before the 
student body for acceptance as College Creed, was at this time formulated to 
help us achieve a college grade of ethics in such situations. Whether the spirit 
of the pioneer still had a hold on our imaginations as a group it is hard to say, 
but certainly it was in that spirit that May Day, as a Framingham State Teachers 
College function, was inaugurated. 

In Chalmers Theater on May eleventh, we presented the "Tale of Princess 
Britomart" from Spenser's, Faerie Queen.'' The three roles of honor were 
filled by presenting the question to the entire student body with but one 
qualification for the choice. The May Queen was of course to be selected 
from the Sophomore class, Marjorie Whittier was chosen,- the Spirit of Spring — 
from the Junior Class, Mary Nolan was elected; The Spirit of Framingham from 
the Senior Class, Arleen Morse was elected. To Miss Cummings, as our 
faculty advisor, much of the success of the undertaking was due, and we can, 
with no little satisfaction, sit back and watch the growth of a Framingham 
custom which we started. 

' Tempus fugit," and we are juniors with Practice Teaching and House 
Practice looming on a very near horizon. Most of our fears were proven worth- 
less for we certainly survived the difficulties of teaching. Some things we 
started on the way, but for Crocker, as a dormitory, we seem to have been the 
finish. However, to have been the last class housed in Crocker is in itself a 
distinction of which we are proud. "We" may have put the finishing touches 
to Crocker, but an "anonymous individual" almost put the finishing touch to 
May Hall while we were enjoying the spring recess. The extra week's vacation 
the fire in May Hall entailed was just one week more in which to prepare for 
the Junior Prom and who is there to say it wasn't joyously received. The Prom, 
as most proms are, was individually and collectively a "howling" success, and 
while we still were in the process of "remembering" what we did "when," 
June arrived and left us standing breathless before the next gateway to the 
future. 

September arrived anon, and all the responsibility and duties which 
seniority entailed were ours. The process is now reversed and we received 
the Freshmen in a body in Chalmers Theatre to attempt the doubtful task of 
self-introductions and acquaintanceship. I wonder if our senior sisters found 
it difficult to keep their amusement at our actions to themselves? We have 
never lacked for things to do, but this year — oh, my! With the Informal Dances, 
Harvard-Yale Weekend, The Mock Man Dance, International Night, Candle- 
light Service, Carol Singing and the Formal Dances sprinkled into our very 
full curricula, we have been almost too busy even to note that 

Light and Darkness in perpetual round 
Lodge and dislodge by turns." 

By June our new administrative building may be sufficiently far advanced for 
the Class of 1936 once more to leave its mark upon the walls of Framingham, 
for who other than mother nature could prevent the ivy of 1936 from spreading 
its tendrils over her walls. June with all its connotative significance is not far 
from us. Whither now? 

MARGUERITE PHILBIN. 



AG1 



impse 



P : 



nlo the Tutu 



re 




February 14, 1956. 
Dear Cynthia, 

Even if you hadn't made me promise to let you know immediately about 
my visit to Anderson's Progressive College for Non-Conformists, I should 
have hastened to write, so great was my surprise at discovering the Anderson 
in question to be our old friend Engla. Had I given the college a thought, 
I might have guessed, for who else could conform quite so successfully? 

The first person to greet me was Dean Wrrittier, who, with the assistance 
of Matrons Oliver and Spring, meets visitors to see that they arrive and leave 
at the proper time from the correct doors. They are all kept quite busy 
covering up the merry pranks of the pupils and sending flowers to the victims. 
Orchids had just been sent to Miss Veronica Bahleda, a prominent club- 
woman now in a nearby hospital suffering from wounds inflicted by the pupils 
after her twelve hour lecture on "Expansion.'' On a later visit to the hospital, I found 
the clubwoman to be our own Ronnie, who, after putting the orchids in 
the ice box for the evening, introduced me to the dietitian, Miss Dutton, 
who was kind enough to have Nurse McPike show me around. I was 
amazed to see Gert, who tells me she decided on her vocation after having 
an arm chair reserved for her during a home nursing course in Crocker. 
One of the doctors, "Salvy" I think was his name, was most charming and 
said I should remember his wife, who once accounted with me in lunch- 
room. As that week is still quite hazy to me I can t seem to place her, 
but anyway they live in the same apartment with Maydell Champney, 
who was, as you remember, always fascinated by the place, 
seem to be way ahead of my story, but you must admit that this letter was your 
idea. After leaving the dean I was attracted to the auditorium by a glorious voice owned 
by Miss Marie McPherson of the Metropolitan Opera, who was accompanied by Miss 
Elizabeth Sullivan. This was the beginning of an entertainment 
that I wouldn t have missed. Two country demonstrators, the Misses 
Bauer and Shoultz, gave a talk on the home canning of tomatoes. 
Then Miss Aronson, founder of the progressive dance, did several 
interpretations assisted by her company composed of Miss Ruggles 
and Miss Stonkus. Following this was a demonstration on cake 
decorating by Miss Dahill, who started on a small scale by frosting 






Dot Aronson her sophomore year at college. The assembly ended 
with the fantasy "The Dawn Came in Like Thunder", directed by 
Miss Sands, the dramatic member of the faculty, assisted by Miss 
Archibald, who, it is said, was responsible for the emphatic en- 
trance of dawn. After the play, "stills" of the scenes were taken 
by Photographer Schuerch and her assistant Miss Scena, who were 
chosen class photographers after a grim battle by a rival photographer 
whose wife is the former Hermaline Gage, classmate of the winner. The irony of the 
situation lies in the fact that Hinky was introduced to her husband by Miss Schuerch. 
On my way to the gymnasium from the assembly hall I found the corridors a bit too 
non-conforming and blundered into the lunchroom directed by Miss Jacqueline Hall, 
who was at the time filling salt shakers. Another Miss Hall, Betsey I think her name was, 
took charge of the serving, and proved most efficient at satisfying the college boys. The 
position of foods taster is becoming a new opening for home economics graduates, due 
to the work of Miss Mary Benson. She tastes all lunchroom products to see that the 
pupils do not progress to the stage of doing away with one another. "A risky vocation, 
but the meals are regular not to mention free," says Benny. 

Again I started for the gym, which was, by the way, to be shown to me by Miss 
Brosnan, who had unexpectedly gone on her annual twelve months' vacation, leaving me 
to my explorations. On the first floor I stopped in to hear a lecture on the practicability 
of raccoon coats, given by Miss Edith Rose, head of the clothing department. Miss 
Rose claims that the use of the coats indoors as couches is b 
tain sets, as their service as outer garments. 

Finally the gym! I didn't discover it alone but was aided by the com- 
pany of Bell and Lacouture, detectives connected with the school. For 
awhile they puzzled me with their talk of "J" women in their employ, but 
they turned out to be merely the descendants of the famous "G" men of our 
time. After that age give away, I implore you to join me in a consultation 
with the famous Ann Minichiello, who will at least bring our figures up to 
date by means of outdoor exercises. I've heard that even a glimpse of Miss 
Minichiello in her green sports suit is invigorating. Personally I've never 
seen her, but I've read that this costume started her on her career when she 
borrowed it to wear Christmas caroling while in college. 

Let me see, wasn't I in the gym before I started to revive my figure? 
As a football game was in progress when I arrived, the first thing that caught 
my eye was a tall, well built young man, really the star player who later 
introduced me to his mother, the former Eleanor King. After the game, a 
course in ballroom etiquette was conducted by Miss Helen Harrigan, whose 
position consists mainly of teaching handsome men in uniform how to sit 
out during dances. 

My stay in the sport world was cut short by the appearance of another faculty 
member, Miss Lovelace, advisor for the "Progressive Periodical," who introduced me 
to her assistants, Zaleski and Mulligan, who are in charge of giving notices. The illustra- 



ies is becoming as popular, in cer- 





tions were unique enough to arouse my curiosity as to the artist, a very well dressed 
little lady, whose mother was Jennie Wisowaty. On the front page of the pamphlet! 
saw the names Maynard and Sjogren, Iwo outstanding political figures who have pro- 
gressed to the point of controlling the school board. Among the social items was the 
engagement announcement of Evelyn Winship, prominent figure in many romances, who 
is marrying a former school sweetheart. Miss Grace Russell, personal friend of the couple, 
when interviewed about the engagement, is quoted as no longer having any interest 
in men, all her attention being taken by horses. Another article of interest was the 
robbery of the famous Howe diamond collection started by Miss Howe in her senior 
year at college. 

In a nearby office sat mail censors Schweitzer and Baker, whose job 
it is to remove all bombs from the envelopes before they are taken to 
Matron Reynolds for distribution. Some time later I bumped into a group 
of pupils seated in the corridor, being taught their alphabet by Miss< 
Osterlund, who received her experience with the N. Y. A. Hildegard 
is forced to hold her classes informally until the interior decorating firm 
of Walther and Wiitanen finish with her room. Irjz is doing sketches for 
the walls, while Tony takes care of the furniture painting, an occupation 
which appealed to her even when a school girl. 

I wanted to see Flo Sharpe before leaving, but as faculty advisor to 

the Student Government Association she is kept busy checking up on 
the attendance at the local theatre owned by Helen Murphy. 

I was pleased to see Ginny Anderson in the position of faculty 
advisor, where she finally gets credit for lending a helping hand to the 
rest of the world. 

Thus far I fear I have dealt more with personalities than with the 
school system, but I m afraid that in this evening s paper you will be 
able to read more than enough about that for I left just in time to miss 
being blown up with the rest of the school when the Chem. laboratory, 
in charge of Miss Virginia Giffin, exploded. 





Sincerely, 



Rhode 



June 10, 1956. 



Dear Rhoda, 



It certainly did seem good renewing 



and 



Our trip this past month was a huge success, 
all our old acquaintances! 

While in New York, we saw the play "What Happens to College Girls," produced 
and directed by Mary Sharpe, with "A" Boyd as recording director and "Ginny" 
Boucher as designer of gowns. The artistic settings were by Ames, Shmauk, and Mac- 
Farland. The picture was splendid — can it be possible that they developed these talents 
at F. T. C? 

On the way home we stopped to see Mary Falvey, who told us of the progress 
she has made in conducting her school for the feeble-minded. Mary introduced Eleanor 
Meyerovitz, her assistant; Eleanor Brown, art teacher,- and Eileen Kenney, teacher of 
penmanship. Mary's school is situated just a short way from our beloved Alma Mater. 
Then there appeared Barbara Macora with a huge St. Bernard following at her 
heels. I couldn't help but smile, as I recalled how we, as Elementary Degree Seniors, 
tried to help Barbara overcome her fear of dogs. Barbara was making her way to the 
Art Studio of Kaplan, Paladino, Leary, and Mancini. The studio is divided into four 
sections: the "Art of Forgetting," the "Art of Weaving," the "Art of Sculpturing," 
the "Art of Teaching." At the desk marked the "Art of For- 
getting" sat Stella. She's still up to her old tricks of giving 
advice to the lovelorn — still the philosophical Stella. Just then 
she was giving some advice to a smart looking young lady — yes, 
it was Ginny Healey. Ginny always did have implicit faith in 
Stella's advice. Rose, Grace, and Regina headed the other 
three departments and appeared very busy and extemely happy. 

Memories came flowing back as we approached the Center 
— glad and sad memories — as I beheld in the distance the top 
of May Hall. We left the car at Seiler's, and as we sauntered 
up State Street we saw "Socrates," carefully explaining to an 

ignorant Junior how to get started on her source theme. It 
sounded very much like the advice given by Miss Gerritson 
when I was in F. S. T. C. "Socrates" is now one of Miss 
Gerritson's assistants in the English department — I remembered 
that "Socrates" had always been attached, more or less, to the 
English department. 

In another section of the building, we came upon the Music 
Studio where Rosalie Dolan and Mim Rothkopf were in charge. 
Just as in the old college days, the strains from Rosalie s violin 
brought that familiar, beautiful theme to my ears, The Old 
Refrain." In the other section of the studio was Mim trying to 
get some "pep" into a group of choristers. If success be measured by energy, then 
Mim's energy ought surely to be rewarded. 








A. 

















V V V 



I interrupted her just long enough to have her tell me about Connie Lincoln, who 
is, she said, a famous concert pianist. No doubt you've heard of her and of her superb 
orchestra that tours the country annually. 

Across the hall was an interesting sign, labeled, The "Long and Short" of It. What 
could this be? We opened the door slowly and there were Viola Thompson and 
Helen Landry. Viola was conducting a course on the vital subject of the "Advantages 
of Being Tall," while Helen Landry was striving to present the other side of the ques- 
tion, the "Advantages of Being Small." 

It truly seems that the State Board of Education was well satisfied with our class, 
for many of the faculty positions &rz filled by members of our group. New departments 
have opened up — for example, Hildred Boston teaches astronomy. She holds her 
classes at night for furtherance of the visual education movement. Rita Doran is still 
wondering why she isn't teaching kindergarten, but is passing on Frobel's ideas, 
nevertheless. 

Helen says to remember to tell you about Helen Mace and 
Rita Kohler, who are teaching reading 
methods under the direction of Lillian 
Greenglass. In the gym we found Peg 
MacLeod and Jean Marshall teaching tap 
routines to the tune of "Sweet Rosie 
O'Grady,' while Grace and Elsie Randall 
did their bit to aid the light fantastic by 
proving themselves able assistants to Mary 
Bond, instructor of aesthetic dancing. 

The fields of gymnastics and dancing 
have been separated now (something fairly recent in the methods of teaching gymnastics) 
Kippy Ryan and Pat O'Malley are the heads of the athletic de- 
partment and are assisted by Kitty Mc- 
Donough and Kay Harney. 

In the science department I found that 
been established in a 
was neck deep in re- 



oa§ 


ff 





Amelia Santilli had 
new laboratory and 



search, while 
wasanalyzing 
year old Jim- 
world for 
data. Rita 

arithmetic, and Virginia Mon- 
Isn t it queer that even with her 
not know what causes that queer 
after yawning? Ella Bonyman 
recently Rose Philibosian has 
structor. 





Tamao Sato 

all the three 

mies in the 

psychologica 

Smith teaches 

dello is professor of psychology. 

remarkable background she does 

habit of hers — saying "toot toot" 

heads the art department, and 

been employed as knitting in- 



We made our way to the office when we found Rosamund Hurley, vice president, 
had gone to a meeting so her secretary, Rita Mundy, could tell us all the news we had 
not gleaned for ourselves. She said that Bunny Peskin was music supervisor at the 
Framingham district. Poor Bunny — that's some job — supervising all the do-mi-sols of 
this neighborhood. Betty Sherman is head of the college forum. Evidently her experi- 
ence under Miss Cummings has proven profitable. Fro Georgas sends regular reports 
from her missionary base in South Africa — one place in the world where she won t 
have to wade through slush to get to class! 

Sooner or later, I suppose we'll always get to our married friends. Dot Kirby has 
decided in favor of Mass. State and is in the process of living happily ever after. Alice 
Youngson is in the midst of persuading her children to attend Framingham, and Clara 
Weinstein has us all beaten — she is now a "merry widow'' and is studying the modem 
modes of hairdressing. 

It seems that our group doesn't show up as well as yours as far as "catching a man" 
is concerned. So many of your group have children full grown. I guess we just didn't 
learn that the way to a man's heart is through his stomach! 

Do write again. It's so much fun to hear what everyone is doing. 

Sincerely, 

Helen and Cynthia. 




CLA55 OtflLL 



We, the Class of 1936, having acquired a reasonable amount of dignity 
(so we hope), and having arrived at the stage where our Alma Mater can not 
longer contain us, do hereby bequeath and bestow on the faculty and student 
body some of our most valued earthly possessions. 

Let it be known to all these present that said Seniors are in full possession 
of their senses, showing no apparent signs of insanity, and yet not evidencing 
too much intelligence. 

To the faculty, in general, we leave our profoundest respect and thanks 
for their ever helpful guidance through our four years of college life. 

To Miss Gerritson the class bestows, with the author's full consent, the 
manuscript of Marion Davis's original version of "Tristram." 

To Miss Ramsdell we bestow the complete list of "place names" which 
we have acquired through four years, in order to save her the bother of making 
up the said list for incoming classes. 

To Miss Ritchie we leave Helen Boyd's book "The Art of Getting 
Library Books Back on Time." Miss Boyd feels that if all students read this, 
the long list of overdue books will disappear from the bulletin boards. 

To Miss Carter we bequeath our deepest gratitude for having introduced 
us to the worth while literature of the day. 

To Miss Nietzold in behalf of the class, we, Stella Kaplan and Helen 
McMullen, leave our treatise on "Art — for Art's Sake," with the hope that 
she will enjoy reading it as much as we enjoyed preparing it. 

To Miss Armstrong we bestow our deep appreciation for having the 
happy faculty of winning our confidence, and better still, retaining it. 

To Miss Rochefort we bequeath our heartfelt gratitude for keeping our 
minds and hearts ever awake to the interesting career before us. 

To Mr. Workman we leave a book on "Economics" dealing only with 
the minimum essentials of the subject, hoping that he will use the same with 
our successors. 



To Miss Hunt we leave an illustrated essay on the thermocouple by 
Anne Hagerty. 

With funds permitting, the senior class bequeathes to Miss Kingman, for 
her class, a recording machine. 

To Miss Cummings we leave Eileen Kenneys book ' Truth, Where Art 
Thou?" hoping that she will find some relief in her search for truth, from the 
excellent philosophy contained herein. 

To Mr. Archibald we bequeath a recording of "The Music Goes Round 
and Round," with the desire that he play it once a day in order to develop an 
appreciation of the work of modern jazz kings. 

To the carpenters we leave plans for an elevator in the new microbiology 
lab. to aid Miss Gardner in reaching the top shelf. 

To Mr. Ried a book on "This Modern Art" that will say all he has to say. 

Having bequeathed said priceless gifts on our benevolent faculty, we, 
the class of 1936, do bestow individually and collectively the remaining 
remnants of our possessions. 

To the Art Department, we bequeath, Anita Shmauk's book "Why I 
Seek An Artistic Environment in which To Work." 

To our conception of the all around Framingham girl we bestow: 

Mary Falvey's ability for clear, straight forward thinking, 

Eleanor's Brown's quiet personality, 

Barbara's determination to overcome her fear of the canine species, 

Helen Landry's spirit of adventure, 

Rose Paladino's exuberant energy, 

Viola Thompson's amazing ability to digest the contents of an Economics book, 

Rosalie Dolan's unassuming charm, 

Millie MacFarland's system of planning so that she can go on a snow train trip 

the day before a history thesis is due, 
Virginia Boucher's selection of clothes, 

Grace Mancini's nonchalance, and Regina Leary's ability to get the "mumps" 
just before mid-years. 

To Dot Falvey, Evelyn Ames leaves some of her artistic ability, hoping 
that she will use it advantageously. 





To Margaret Murphy, Eleanor Meyerovitz bequeaths her ability to be 
happy and smiling under the most trying circumstances. 

To Clara Mickelson we leave the exactness of Dorothy Valentine. 

To Betty Emery, Jennie Wisowaty bequeaths her good taste in dress. 

To Shirley Rivitz, Mim Rothkopf leaves one pound of her energy with 
the advice that Shirley expend it for the good of F.S.T.C. 

To Maude Newell, Ginny Healey bequeaths her ability to write short 
stories, advising her that a check comes in useful now and then. 

To Peggy Nielson, Mentana Gatti bequeaths her friendly personality. 

To Virginia McDermott we leave Betsy Hall's artistic ability. 

To Mary Murphy we bequeath a book telling how, when and what to 
tell one man when you have a date with another. This book has been pub- 
lished from actual experiences by Evelyn Winship. 

To Betty Ryder, Anna Nourse bequeaths her ability in typewriting. 

We leave Edna Zaleski's knowledge of Poland to Helen Tomasz. 

To any future advertising manager Virginia GiPfin bequeaths her sales 
talk for advertisers. 

To Evelyn LeFort we bequeath the charming personality of Betty Oliver. 

To Virginia Kerrigan we leave the sweet voice of Libby Lycett and the 
red ringlets of Bette Sands. 

To Ruth Condon we leave Esther Howe's tactics in obtaining a diamond 
from a Framingham man. 

To all downhearted underclassmen Lacky leaves her permanent smile; 
to Louise McManus, Anne Garvin's vivaciousness and pep; to Anna Lemek, 
Anne Geoghegan's good sportsmanship; to Rosamond Patten, Kathy Brosnan s 
ability to do and say the right thing at the right time. 

To Queeney, Maydell Champney bequeaths her notebook in which to 
write the names of the girls who cut chapel. Don't worry, Queeney, you can 
omit your own! 

To all practice teachers Franny Halpin leaves her good teaching via 
interest factors. 



To Evy LeFort, Fro Georgas leaves her popularity; to Shirley Smith, Mim 
Cutting's unassuming way,- to Ruth Anderson the littleness of Grace Mancini. 

A. Boyd leaves her distinction for having the most phone calls to Mary 
Murphy. That's a nice room you've got, Murph! 

To Dot Quinn we leave the wit of Regina Leary; to Betty Ballantine, 
Rosalie Dolan's musical ability. 

Virginia Healey and Rosamond Hurley, the second Bacons, leave their 
ability to some future senior who may thus be a joy to Miss Gerritson. 

The ability of Rose Philibosian as a cartoonist, we leave to Shirley Smith. 

To Dot Furbush we leave Rita Doran's good nature — it always comes in 
handy. 

To Anna Eleanor Murphy, Engla Anderson leaves her alert mind for 
chemistry,- to Skippy Campbell, Virginia Anderson's ability to get everything 
done without bragging,- to Eleanor Waterman, Archie's keenness for athletics. 

Dot Aronson gives her dancing feet to Shux Carroll. 

To all Freshmen interested, Ronnie Bahleda sends her approval of Framing- 
ham men. She ought to know! 

To Esther Stensby, Chris Alach leaves her studiousness,- to Jennie Jen- 
kowski, Ruth Douglass' sweetness. 

Ella Bonyman, Flossy Pacetti, and Ann Hagerty bequeath their auto- 
biography, "The Three Musty Tears," to Eleanor Aiken, Betty Bullard, and 
Betty Emery. 

To Edith Yuill, Dot Brown leaves her distinction of getting all As. 

Edna Cuniffe bequeaths to the school a name card with all necessary 
diacritical marks. 

Rhoda Barnicoat leaves that innocent look to Florence Kellogg. (You 
can't judge a book by its cover.) 

To Shirley Thompson and her followers, Margaret Barnes bequeaths her 
meek attitude. Take it easy, kids, you'll last longer. 

To Marion Jones, Betty Sherman leaves her good naturedness,- Grace 
Randall leaves her low voice to Shirley Rivitz; Alice Gaw, the graciousness of 




Elsie Randall; Rita Smith's daintyness to Trudy Seagrave,- Dottie Lindblad's 
giggle to Anna Friberg,- to underclassmen in musical clubs, Ruth Lovelace's 
musical ability,- to Evelyn Martin, the 4 H Club work of Mildred Maynard; to 
Eleanor Draper, Gert McPike's good nature,- to all underclassmates, Virginia 
Mondello's conscientiousness. 

Dot Kirby, Dot Dillon, Alice Youngson leave all train ticket stubs to make 
a bigger and better bonfire. 

To any commuter Mary Benson leaves her remarkable ability to sleep late 
and still arrive on time. She sure knows how to "make'' the bus drivers — wait. 

To Peirce Hall, Rita Mulligan bequeaths a full fledged broadcasting 
system for meal time notices. Another loud speaker at each table, "Mike'' on 
the platform instead of in the kitchen. 

To Phyllis Hillner we leave Ellen Brown's all round good standing. 

We leave the class of '37, Irja Wiitanen As in Microbiology. 

To Dottie Hixon we leave Margaret Shoultz's blond hair. 

To Jessie Costello, Hildegarde Osterlund bequeaths her ability to get 
things done. Too bad it didn't come sooner. Maybe that clothing problem 
would have come in a week early! 

To Genevra Carpenter we leave the oratorical ability of Marguerite 
Philbin in Sociology class. 

To the next president of the Student Cooperative Association we leave 
the poise and soft voice of Marjorie Whittier. 

To Virginia Crowe we leave Betty Sullivan's ability to play the piano, 
and Tony Walther's knowledge of Brant Rock. 

We leave the long eyelashes of Marion Spring to Louise Segar. 

To Jocelyn Case we bequeath Dot Schuerch's record announcing the 
latest date for submission of glossies. 

To Dorothy Tribe we leave Ann Minichiello's great capacity for work 
and successful accomplishments. 

The executive ability of Ellen Reynolds we leave to anyone who can fill 
her shoes. 



We leave the poise of Edith Rose to Barbara Knapp (not because she 
needs anymore). 

We bequeath Galindia Scena's A in sewing to Frances Pratt (she gets it 
anyway). 

To Virginia Burkett we leave Gertrude Sjogren's meekness,- to Barbara 
Kester another doctor in another Plymouth like Dot Wignot s. 

We bequeath the good sense of humor of Lillian Stonkus to Margaret 
Schneider. 

To Grace O'Donnell we leave the calmness of Mamie Valentine. 

From Peg McLeod, Claire Foster, Adie Pear and Dottie Dillon we leave the 
good appearance of the American Girl to the future teachers. 

To the H. A. Department, Helen Mace bequeaths a book called ' I 
Can't Eat It." 



We bequeath Viola Ruggles' ability in sewing to any freshman who needs 



it. 



To Mabel Mason, Eleanor King bequeaths her ability as Framingham's 
nightingale. 

To all girls using metal curlers regularly every night we leave a sleeping 
powder. (Inquire Chem. lab.). 

To Dot Perkins a punching bag so she can say "Hi," with equal emphasis 
but less pain to her victim,- to Ginny Kiely a preserved finger incased in cotton 
to save the wear and tear on her own. 

To Betty Bullard, Fro Georgas bequeaths her smooth hockey playing. 

The Mail Girls leave their uplifting position to anyone who can answer 
the question "Got a letter for me?" one thousand times in a half hour. 

To Katherine Weeks, Karin Johnson bequeaths her dependability. 

Connie Lincoln and Jean Marshall leave their naturalness to Celia Holt 
and Marion Barnicle. 

To Peggy Guilfoyle we leave the quietness of Anna Stevens. Now maybe 
there'll be peace on third floor! 



To any deserving under classmates, Eleanor Dutton leaves her persever- 



ance. 





Annie Davis wills her height to Evelyn Mackie. 

Hermaline Gage bequeaths her position as Horace Mann Student Matron 
to anyone interested in photography. 

To Ruby Wilson, Jacqueline Hall leaves her joviality. 

Kay Harney and Kay Ryan leave their basketball ability to Betty Proctor 
and Edith Blackburn. 

To Helen Chase, Helen Harrigan leaves her attachment to one man. 
Hang on Chasie! 

In witness whereto, we, the tried but cheerful Seniors, set our hand and 
seal, this bright, sunny day, hoping that in the future, F.S.T.C. will continue 
to have such charming, artistic and promising young ladies with which to 
grace her campus. 

GRACE RUSSEL, 
ANNA SMITH. 




JONATHAN MAYNARD SCHOOL 



We, the Class of 1936, wish to take this opportunity to express our sincere appre- 
ciation to the Faculty of the Jonathan Maynard Training School, for the loyalty and 
helpful support that has been so willingly extended to those of us in both the Elementary 
and Household Arts Departments, who have had the good fortune to come under its 
influence. May this influence guide us through our teaching career and may we always 
remember the Jonathan Maynard School as outstanding in our first step toward our 
chosen profession. 



Jonathan Maynard Faculty 



Lena Cushing, B.S., A.M. 
Alice E. Joyce 
Bertha C Hall, B.S.E. 
Mary L. Caunt 
Robinette Ward 
Mary C. Long 
Ruth S. Dennett 
B. Hazel Davis 
Louise F. Thatcher 
Maria E. Hawes 
Mary Donahue 
Florence M. Cook 



Principal 
Grade VIII 
Grade VII 
Grade VII 
Grade VI 
Grade VI 
Grade V 
Grade IV and V 
Grade IV 
Grade II and III 
Grade I and II 
Grade I 



"FELLOWSHIP IS HEAVEN, AND LACK OF 
FELLOWSHIP IS HELL FELLOWSHIP IS LIFE, 
AND LACK OF FELLOWSHIP IS DEATH: AND 
THE DEEDS YE DO UPON THE EARTH, IT IS 
FOR FELLOWSHIP'S SAKE THAT YE DO 
THEM." 



ORGANIZATIONS 







ACTIVITIES 1935-1936 



September 

September 

September 

October 

October 

October 



17 Tuesday 

19 Thursday 

20 Friday 
7-15 

10 Thursday 



Field Day 

Senior Reception to Freshmen 

A. A. Overnight Hike 

Club Drive Week 

Faculty Reception to Freshmen 



17 Thursday, 4-9 o'clock Y. W. C. A. Bazaar 

November 1 Friday Evening Student Co-operative and C. C. C. Dance 

November 22-23 Harvard-Yale Week-end 

December 8 Sunday A'Kempis Federation Meeting 

December 11 Wednesday Evening International Night 

December 18 Wednesday Evening Musical Clubs Candle Light Service 

December 19 Thursday Evening Senior Carol Singing 




January 


17 


Friday Evening 


Gate Post Dance 


February 


7 


Friday Evening 


Dial Dance 


February 


19 


Wednesday Evening 


A. A. Stunt Night 


March 


6 


Friday Evening 


Worcester Tech-F. T. C. Glee Club Concert 


April 


15 


Wednesday Evening 


Fine Arts Play 


May 


11 


Monday 


Tree Planting 


May 


15 


Friday Evening 


Junior Prom 


May 


22 


Friday 


May Day 


June 


3 


Wednesday 


Pops Concert 


June 


5 


Friday Evening 


Senior Prom 


June 


7 


Sunday 


Baccalaureate 


June 


10 


Wednesday 


Class Day 


June 


11 


Thursday 


Commencement 




STUDENT COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 

President Marjorie Whittier 

Vice President Betty Oliver 

Secretary Betty Ryder 

Treasurer Helen Chase 



The Student Co-operative Association, with every member in the college included 
in its enrollment, is an organization which should promote the interests of our college 
and act as a student governing body through the Student Council. Let us review this 
past year's program to see if one can find proof that this organization has fulfilled its 
aim to work for the benefit of both the students and the college. 

Early in the fall delegates from all the State Teachers Colleges in Massachusetts 
met at Framingham as guests of the Student Co-operative Association. The purpose of 
the conference was twofold: first, to endeavor to unite more closely the Massachusetts' 
State Teachers Colleges, and second, to discuss common problems, the solution of 
which will profit student affairs. This was the first conference of its kind to be held in 
Massachusetts. 

Soon after this the Association in conjunction with the Class and Club Council 
sponsored a sport dance. Christmas week was observed by special chapel programs, 
donations of trees, money, and food to the Framingham Associated Charities, and 
throughout the week the spirit of Christmas pervaded the entire college. Through the 
Chapel and Assembly committees much was done to make our chapel and assembly 
programs of more interest to the student body. A new system of the age-old budget 
question was worked out by a student and faculty committee. 

The increasing powers of the Judicial Board must not be overlooked. Although 
this is a comparatively new organization it has worked successfully in considering cases 
of discipline within the student body. Through the co-operation of the student body 
in these various activities the Student Council has endeavored to carry out the aims 
and ideals of the Student Co-operative Association. 





JUDICIARY BOARD 

Chairman, Betty Oliver 
Kathleen Ryan Harriet Johnson 

Isabel Daniels Helen Walker 

Advisor, Miss Rochefort 



The Judiciary Board is made up of the Vice President of the Student Co-operative 
Association who automatically becomes Chairman, one other member of the Senior 
Class, two members of the Junior Class, one member of the Sophomore Class and a 
Faculty Advisor. This is the second year of the existence of the Judiciary Board. It's 
function is to consider matters of discipline which are referred to it arid to make recom- 
mendations. It tries to meet these cases in a constructive way with the object of en- 
couraging a better school spirit of self discipline. 




President 
Vice President 
Secretary 



CHEMISTRY COUNCIL 



Ellen Brown 
Elsie Miller 
Genoveffa Corea 



The Chemistry Council is made up of three members from the three upper classes 
and two members from the freshman class, the faculty members of the chemistry depart- 
ment acting as advisors. 

The chemistry department uses the honor system. The aim of the Council is to 
provide opportunities for the development of leadership and responsibility and to 
promote student government. 





QUIET AND ORDER COMMITTEE 



Chairman 
Assistant Chairman 



Maydell Champney 
Rita Mulligan 
Jeanette Wilcox 
Genoveffa Corea 
Dorothy Fuller 




This year the Quiet and Order Committee has centered its efforts on improving 
our Chapel exercise — and its efforts have not been in vain. The student body has co- 
operated in making these exercises what they were intended to be — short periods for 
meditation before the work of the day is begun. 

The committee has co-operated with the Faculty Committee on Chapel Programs. 
It was entirely responsible for planning the chapel exercises for the week preceding 
Christmas. 

The Quiet and Order Committee has assumed, also, certain definite duties con- 
nected with Peirce Hall dining room, such as the arrangement of the seating and general 
order of the room. 




R. Bahleda 
D. Bell 



LIBRARY COUNCIL 

Chairman — E. Howe 
Librarian — Ella Ritchie 

E. Miller 

J. Barrow: 

E. Aiken 



E. Vuill 

J. Sroczynski 



We are fortunate in that our library is the best State Teachers College Library in 
Massachusetts. The Council, consisting of representatives from each class, works with 
Miss Ritchie, the librarian, in an effort to maintain a high standard of co-operation in 
the use of our library. 





COMMUTERS' COUNCIL 
Chairman, Viola Ruggles 
Rose Paladino Ruth Thompson 

Rose Pilibosian Marion Jones 

Marion Barnicle Eleanor Whiting 

Ruth Anderson Catherine Blyth 



For many years Framingham has had some type of formal organization for commuters. 
This past fall, however, the existing organization was dissolved by popular vote of 
those most concerned. In its place was substituted a Commuters Council to be composed 
of eight representatives from the various classes with Dean Savage to act as adviser. 

This council has had a busy year. It has met regularly at the call of the chairman, 
and has concentrated on the problems of the commuters which have become exceed- 
ingly great with the rapid increase in members of the group. The council has eliminated 
any program of social nature, thus enabling the commuters to participate in the more 
general activities of college life. 

Early in the fall, a delightful tea was given in Crocker Hall, with Mrs. Bagnall and 
Dean Savage as hostesses. The new council assisted most efficiently to make the tea a 
very happy and successful occasion. 




CLASS AND CLUB COUNCIL 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Constance Lincoln 
Edna Zaleski 
Ruth Douglass 



The Class and Club Council is a small organization which includes in its member- 
ship, President, Secretary and Treasurer, the class and club presidents, the Dial Editor 
and the Gatepost Editor. 

The Council has tried this year to fulfill its two broad aims: the promoting of a 
feeling of co-operation and good will among the clubs and classes,- the development 
of a deeper understanding between the student body and the faculty. 

In order that it might make repairs on the Class and Club Cottage, the Council in 
conjunction with the Student Co-operative Association sponsored a successful Sport 
Dance in Peirce Hall. 

The Class and Club Council thanks the students for their suggestions for making 
the social functions on the hill more to their liking. We are certain that with your 
continued co-operation, our activities will be assured of great success. 






GATE POST STAFF FOR 1936-1937 

Managing Editor Louise Sondermann 

Elizabeth Stone 



Assistant Editor 
Business Manager . 
Assistant Manager 
Advertising Manager 



Helen Louise Howe 
Ella Anderson 
Rosamond Patten 



Another year has seen the Gate Post continue to hold a definite role in the interest 
of F. T. C. students and alumnae. It has become an integral factor in recording the aims 
and activities of the college for those who are interested both off and on the campus. 

This year has seen the paper diminish to a smaller size with more pages and with 
many clever cartoons. The editorials still bring forth from the readers many favorable 
comments. 

During the past year the number of alumnae subscribers to the Gate Post has greatly 
increased, thus proving that the paper is used as one means of keeping posted on the 
college news. 

Due to the co-operative work of the staff and to the fine efforts of Miss Carter the 
paper has continued to develop in its service of bringing to the public eye the life of 
the college at its best. 




DIAL STAFF 



Managing Editor 

Editor 

Art Editor 

Business Manager 

Assistant Editor 

Assistant Business Manager 

Advertising Manager 

Assistant Art Editor 

Assistant Art Editor 

Assistant Art Editor 

Athletics 



Hu 



mor 



Class Wills . 
Class Histories 
Class Prophecies 



DOROTHY SCHUERCH 

MARGARET SHOULTZ 

GALINDIA SCENA 

DOROTHY BROWN 

. JOCELYN CASE 

MIRIAM ROTHKOPF 

. VIRGINIA GIFFIN 

. ANITA SCHMAUK 

KARIN JOHNSON 

IRJA WIITANEN 

. . MARY BOND 

GERTRUDE McPIKE 

DOROTHY PERKINS 

GRACE RUSSELL 

ANNA SMITH 

MARGUERITE PHILBIN 

ROSAMUND HURLEY 

RHODA BARNICOAT 

CYNTHIA KENWAY 



The editors of the yearbook of the class of 1936 wish to express their sincere 
appreciation to those who have helped make this "Dial" a success. We are much in- 
debted to the faculty for their cooperation, and to the students for their support. 
Particularly ere we indebted to Mr. Ried and Mr. Workman whose willing assistance 
and helpful advice have done much to help us avoid pitfalls and overcome difficulties. 





FINE ARTS CLUB 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Publicity Manager 
Gate Post 



Antoinette Minichiel 
Bette Sands 
Blanid Queeney 
Jeanette Wilcox 
Rhoda Barnicoat 
Eileen Hartnett 



The Fine Arts Club was organized to supplement the every day life of the student 
with the opportunities for cultural arts. Its purpose is both educational and social. 

The club offers various groups in which the student may participate. They dre 
radio, art, literature, — and the ones which have been added this year, — puppetry, 
music appreciation, dancing and choral speaking. The radio group broadcasts weekly 
under the direction of Miss Kingman, the faculty adviser. 

The club gave the Thanksgiving assembly program, and, with the Glee Club and 
Choir gave the Christmas assembly program at which time they presented a pageant, — 
"The Greatest Wish." Children from the Jonathan Maynard School assisted in both 
of these programs. At the regular monthly meetings of the club there have been talks 
or demonstrations on radio, art, puppetry and other subjects which the groups are 
studying. 

The annual play, given in March, was a decided departure from the usual program 
in that President Bagnall allowed the club to invite gentlemen from the Framingham 
Civic League Players to take part in our production, "The Misleading Lady," a three 
act play by Charles W. Goddard and Paul Dickey. This is the first time that Framingham 
has given a play with "real" men in the cast. The club is indebted to Miss Kingman 
for the affiliation of the Fine Arts Club with the Civic League Players. We appreciate 
the co-operation of the players, and we hope we may have the opportunity of inviting 
them to join us at another time. 









THE MISLEADING LADY 





HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 



President .... 

Vice President 
Secretary .... 
Treasurer .... 
Chairman — Program Committee 
Chairman — Publicity Committee 
Chairman — Finance Committee 



Marie L. Schwietzer 
Helen Louise Howe 
Gladys Clark 
Eleanor Waterman 
Barbara Knapp 
Caroline Auld 
Helen B. Eldredge 



Faculty Advisors 



M, 



ss Buckley 



Miss Weeks 



The Home Economics Club was organized at Framingham in 1924. In 1930 it took 
the name of Louisa A. Nicholas Home Economics' Club in appreciation of Miss Nicholas 
who was the head of the Household Arts department at Framingham for many years. 

The purpose of the club is to bring together students who are interested in Home 
Economics, and through its affiliation with the New England State, and American Home 
Economics' Associations, broader contacts have been made possible. 

A special honor came to our club when Barbara Knapp was chosen to represent 
the student Home Economic Clubs of Massachusetts at the annual convention held at 
Chicago last June. 

In October a conference of the student clubs was held at Massachusetts State 
College, Amherst. 

The speakers at club meeting have been: Miss Cummings, one of our faculty mem- 
bers telling of her trip to Mexico; Mr. Gregorian, of Newton, Mass., a connoisseur 
of Oriental rugs; Miss Emma Maurice Tighe, Home Service Director of the Edison 
Electric Company; Miss Rachael Butterworth of Framingham; and Miss Maniza Moore, 
head dietitian of Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. 

On December 11, our assembly hall was the scene of a gay fete, "International 
Night.'' Picturesque posters, foreign delicacies, Swedish dancers, and talented foreign 
students, spread an air of Christmas jollity to the entire group. 

The club wishes to thank their faculty advisors Miss Buckley and Miss Weeks, and 
all other members of the faculty and student body for their co-operation and support. 




FRAMINGHAM FORUM 



During the past year the Framingham Noon and Evening Forum groups for the dis- 
cussion of national and international problems have been steadily increasing centers of 
student interest, despite the fact that they are informal and unorganized. They have 
been sponsored by various activities in the college. 

Commuters have a weekly meeting over their lunch trays. The Evening Forum is 
equally informal as current issues are discussed to the accompaniment of flying needles. 

Occasional guest speakers have been welcomed and warmly supported by the 
students. 

Elizabeth Sherman has been the leader of the noon group, while the evening group 
has been under the leadership of Ellen Reynolds. Miss Cummings, faculty advisor for 
both groups, is an inspiration to stimulating discussion of current problems. 






MUSICAL CLUBS 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Librarian 



Barbara Chadwick 
Claire Foster 
Helen Archibald 
Eleanor King 
Betty Proctor 



The Glee Club, Choir and Orchestra make up the unit that is called the Musical 
Clubs. These clubs earnestly try to provide a constant source through which the stu- 
dents of the college may gain a deeper and finer appreciation of good music. 

This unit is slightly different from the other clubs in that two years membership 
with attendance at its weekly or bi-weekly meetings merits one point of credit. 

The year's activities began during the week preceding Thanksgiving when special 
music was provided, both by the Choir and the Glee Club, during Chapel time. 

Christmas was an exceedingly busy time for us: The Choir singing special music 
in Chapel: the Glee Club giving a very successful half-hour program of Carols over 
Radio Station W.E.E.I.; the Glee Club also singing Carols at the Framingham Hospital, 
and finally, the combined clubs presenting a most impressive program of Christmas music 
at our annual Candlelight Service. 

Our Annual Concert this year was treated a bit differently, perhaps, than in other 
years. A Cantata, "A Legend of Granada" by Mumford and Hadley, was given by the 
Glee Club, during a Monday assembly period. 

In March a joint concert was presented with the members of the Musical Clubs 
from the Worcester Polytechnical Institute. The same program was given a few weeks 
later in March, at the Institute in Worcester. Dancing followed both concerts. 

In June the Glee Club will again sing at Pops, on Framingham Night. 

Commencement week all the Clubs will take an active part in the programs; the 
Choir singing at Baccalaureate and the combined clubs contributing in the music for 
Class Day. 

We want to express our sincere gratitude to Mr. Archibald, through whose 
untiring efforts it has been possible to have such a successful year, and to the members 
of the various clubs who have not gone unrewarded for their hard and faithful work 
during the year. 




STRING ENSEMBLE 



. A A J| %_% *; 



CHOIR 





THOMAS A'KEMPIS CLUB 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Federation Delegate 
Publicity Manager 



Mary E. Murphy 
Anne A. Geoghegan 
Marie K. Brady 
Grace O'Donnell 
Veronica Bahleda 
Mary Campbell 




The Thomas A Kempis Club, named after a priest and writer of the fourteenth 
century, was organized to bring together girls of the Catholic faith. The club sponsors 
two communion breakfasts, one in the Fall and one in the Spring; at these breakfasts 
we have outstanding leaders in Catholic action address the club. 

A delegate is sent to each monthly meeting of the New England Province of the 
Federation of College Catholic Clubs, of which our club is a member. The province is, 
in turn, affiliated with the national organization. In March it was the pleasure of the 
A'Kempis Club to entertain the federation delegates of other colleges at a business 
meeting and tea which was held on the hill. 

The club's purpose is threefold, religious, educational, and social in this order of 
importance. It stands for Catholic culture and Catholic fellowship. "Catholic culture 
is a telling, a cultivating of the whole self, a disciplining, a refining of body, well-being, 
soul, mind, heart. It is the bringing out to fullest development of every human quality 
and attribute of the person and personality that we possess in miniature, capable almost 
of infinite development in the mold of which each person is made like to God. God 
made the creature to reflect His perfections. Catholic culture is the sanctification and 
socialization of the individual." 

We are deeply grateful to our chaplain, Father Dunford, upon whom so much of 
the character of our club depends,- to Miss Alice Joyce, our faculty advisor, for her 
unfailing interest,- and to the A'Kempis members for their loyal and whole-hearted 
support. 





f ..! 




^% 






> 


„ m*n 




• 


H w 


BP^^m 




V 


S a 


r- 


3 ■' 

'9, - 




JL 




^^F^ * " ^^ 


■ I 1 1 


f 




1 #1 


1 ®M 


■■/■ 


r 


* 






w* ' *l 


• i*«*\ 


*> 





YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

President Hildegard Osterlund 



Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Advisors 



Isabel Daniels 
Linnea Anderson 
Tamao Sato 
Mae C. Turner 
Eleanor F. Chase 



An Al Fresco party held in Chalmers Theatre in September, welcomed the Fresh- 
men and upper classmen to the V. W. C. A. activities for the year. Our guests, Miss 
Ann Silver, Mrs. Jackson, and Mrs. Wright, greeted the girls and told them of the work 
of the Metropolitan Headquarters. 

A Country Fair held in May Hall in October gave the girls an opportunity for 
doing their Christmas shopping early." A stock-judging contest — prize stuffed animals 
— a real harvest supper, and last but not least — real country dancing with a Nova 
Scotian fiddler, were the highlights of the evening. 

At Christmas time a group gave an entertainment and gifts from the club to the 
women at the Old Ladies' Home. Flowers and story books were sent to the Framing- 
ham hospital. Also at this time a group of girls attended the very lovely Christmas vesper 
services at Wellesley College. 

The discussion groups of the past years have been continued, and a new Family 
Relationships group under the leadership of Mrs. Jackson has been formed. The club 
has had several guest speakers, and has sent girls to conferences at Cedar Hill, Phillips 
Brooks House, and the Metropolitan Council in Boston. We are also planning to send 
a delegation to the Maqua Conference in June. 




ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Grace E. Barfclett — Class of '02 

Christine Moses Bennett (Mrs. Frank E.) — Class of '08 

Mary C. Moore— Class of '72 

Annie B. Penniman — Class of '03 




GREETINGS 

You have received much from your Alma Mater, 

Be eager to give much through active service in your Alumnae 
Association. 

Respond generously to the calls of your Alma Mater because you 
believe in the Framingham Training and the Framingham 
Spirit. 







<A 






ts*»zii~.gb 



-M' 





OUR NEW ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 




"AND YOUNG AND OLD COME FORTH TO PLAY 



ON A SUNSHINE HOLIDAY." 



ATHLETICS 






ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President Mary Bond 

Vice President Phyllis Sparhawk 

Secretary Anna Lemek 

Treasurer Beatrice Racicot 

Publicity Manager Karin Johnson 



We can't all play a winning game; 

Someone is sure to lose. 
Yet we can play so that our name 

No one may dare accuse. 
That when the Master Referee 

Scores against our name, 
It won't be whether we've won or lost, 

But how we've played the game. 

— T. B. Downie. 



$\ 



/ 
^ 



J> 



THE MODERN DANCE 

The newest phase of dancing, known as "modern" is one of the 
popular choices offered by the Athletic Association. Expression of 
moods, of pictures, and of ideas &rz few of the interpretations carried 
out. Such freedom of motion not only offers exercise of superior 
quality, but it affords an opportunity for the development of creative 
power in the individual. This year the art has reached a high peak 
and will continue to do so under the leadership of Miss Taylor. 



■4i 



BOWLING 

Bowling is one of the more strenuous exercises which seems to 
be gaining in popularity. In preceding years it was rather masculine 
to be a good bowler, but as far as the "Fram" girls are concerned, 
they're pretty limber when it comes to "rolling up" spares and 
strikes. 



f 



V 



<i 



ARCHERY 

Archery, the sport which our college adopted last year, has 
been making much head-way this year. The boarders are rather 
timid with their bows, but the commuters know where to shoot their 
arrows. Lets have more about some of those "star" archers because 
we already have acquired a new set of equipment, and we need 
plenty of sharp shooters. 



^ 
« 





HARVARD HOCKEY TEAM 

KIPPy RYAN, Captain Center Forward 

ROSE PALADINO Left Win g 

MARY CAMPBELL *...-, Left Inner 

FRANCES HALPIN Right Inner 

MARY BOND Ri g ht Wing 

LOUISE WHITTEMORE Left Halfback 

FRO GEORGAS Center Halfback 

FLORENCE PACETTI ". Right Half 

DOROTHY PERKINS Left Fullback 

LILLIAN GREENGLASS Right Fullback 

PHYLLIS PHELAN Goalie 



HARVARD— YALE WEEK-END 

If you were on the hill for Harvard — Yale week-end, read this to renew fond 
memories; if you didn't see it, read it and weep because you missed it. 

The weather man had a day off that day, but the Harvard and Yale teams were 
on' with a capital 'O.' It was a wonderful opportunity for those hockey teams to show 
how rugged they really were. In spite of snow and hail — and a little rain just for 
variety — sweat-shirts came off, and eleven girls in smart red tunics faced eleven girls 
who were ready to fight for the blue they were wearing. 

The whistle blew — Well, can I describe what went on after that? A hard fought 
game, both sides playing with all their might, and then "Skippy" Campbell cracked that 
game wide open with a goal for Harvard! 

Flossie and Anna Smith were taking turns on the roll-in during that second half 
until the referee began to think that one of them wanted the ball for a souvenir. 

When the final whistle blew, the score still stood 1-0-Harvard. 




YALE HOCKEY TEAM 

EVELYN LE FORT, Captain Center Forward 

ALICE HORGAN Left Win g 

BARBARA CARLE Left Inner 

BETTY BULLARD Right Inner 

EDITH YUILL Right Wing 

BETTY EMERY Left Halfback 

PRISCILLA HORTON Center Halfback 

ANNA SMITH Right Halfback 

MEANE SULLIVAN Left Fullback 

HELEN ELDRIDGE Righi Fullback 

FRANCES MANVEL Right Halfback 

DOROTHY FURBUSH Goalie 



Orchids to Captain "Kippy" Ryan and Captain "Evy" Le Fort! 

Did you think I had forgotten that basketball game? I guess not! Who could forget 
that 10 girls actually played basketball in half a gym. Actually, after all the excited 
girls, faculty and alumni included, of course, were packed into that famous Gym, 
there was very little floor space left. Nevertheless, under the capable leadership of 
Kay Harney for the blue, and Edith Blackburn for the red, those girls played a game 
which was a joy to see. Yale played hard, determined to overcome the lead which 
Harvard had taken at the beginning,- but Harvard was just as determined, and the 
game ended with the score standing Harvard 35, Yale, 24. 

Then came the banquet, with toasts and more toasts, but everyone who was toasted 
deserved that and more too, for helping to make such a grand week-end. 





K 




HARVARD BASKETBALL TEAM 

EDITH BLACKBURN, Captain Forward 

BETTY PROCTOR Forward 

HELEN ARCHIBALD Forward 

INEZ DAVIS Guard 

MURIEL DAVIS Guard 

EVELYN SIBLEY ' . Guard 




V 

\ urUBMl " \. 

) si — — ■. 

YALE BASKETBALL TEAM 

KAY HARNEY, Captain Forward 

ANNE GEOGHEGAN Forward 

ANNA LEMEK Forward 

EMMA NELSON Guard 

HELEN WALKER Guard 

CLAIRE FOSTER Guard 



z^fc-^ 



'SPORT THAT WRINKLED CARE DERIDES 
AND LAUGHTER HOLDING BOTH HIS SIDES.' 



HUMOR 




NIPS AND TUCKS FROM POPULAR MUSIC 

I Saw Stars Science Class 

I've Got Rhythm in My Nursery Rhymes Miss Carter 

The Gentleman Obviously Doesn't Believe Mr. Workman 

Sweet Adeline Adeline Pear 

An All American Girl Jean Marshall 

Good-night Little Girl of My Dreams Anne Garvin 

Sweet and Lovely Flossie Pacetti 

With My Eyes Wide Open I'm Dreaming Rita Smith 

At A Little Church Affair Helen Maroney 

I Feel Like A Feather in The Breeze Dot Perkins 

I've Got To Get Hot Loretta McGrath 

If I Should Lose You (M.B.G.) Marion Davis 

I'd Rather Listen to Your Eyes Rita Mundy 

A Picture of Me Without You Seniors without Freshmen 

Hypnotized Pat O'Malley 

Trucking Betty Sherman 

Now You've Got Me Doing It Connie Lincoln 

So Nice Seeing You Again Bea Hipson 

Weary Elementary Seniors 

You've Got What It Takes Kippy Ryan 

The Music Goes Round and Round Mr. Archibald 

Where Am I All day 

My Sweet Faculty 

In a Little Old Cathedral Town Miss Gerritson 

Don't Give Up the (Whaling) Ship Miss Ramsdell 

Top Hat, White Tie and Tails Senior Prom 

Sweet Thing Miss Nietzold 

Go Into Your Dance Miss Taylor 

Simply Grand Miss Lamed 

I'm Sitting High On a Hilltop F. S. T. C 

Thief in the Night In the library 

Where Am I? Archie 

No Other One Millie Maynard 

This Evening About 8:45 Hildegarde Osterlund 

You're the Top Hinky Gage 

Accent on Youth Dot Schuerch 

Honest, I Ain't Lazy, I'm Just Dreaming Elinor Dutton 

There's a Tavern In the Town Lacky 

Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie Jackey Hall 

You Hit the Spot Helen Murphy 

Love Is a Dancing Thing Betty Sullivan 

Me (Graham) and Marie Marie Schweitzer 

Double Trouble Grace Russell 



Alone 

I'm Lost in a F05 

/o// l/z y y<z //a/ ["o Go Ho"? 
No Other One 
Why Shouldn't I? 
Too Much Imagination 
I'll Never Say Never, Again, Again 
Come To Me My Melancholy Baby 
You Ought to Be In Pictures 
A Little Bit Independent 
While Walking Thru the Park One Day 
You've Got To Be a Football Hero 
In the Middle of a Kiss 
Piccolo Pete 
Love in Bloom 
Sophisticated Lady 
The Music Goes Round and Round 
Eeny Meeny Miney Mo 
The Girl with Dreamy Eyes 
My Time is Your Time 
Let's Put Out the Lights 
The Sidewalks of New /orV 
I Love You Truly 

Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf 
Paris in the Spring 

When a Gypsy Makes His Violin Cr/ 
//ear/ 

Me and My Shadow 
Two Cigarettes in the Dark 
No Other One 
Sweet and Lovely 
Take It Easy 
Here's To You 
I'm All Tangled Up in Love 
With You on My Mind 
Solitude 

I Wish I Were Aladdin 
Horses, Horses, Crazy over Horses 
From the Top of Your Head to the 

Tip of Your Toes 
Everything's Been Done Before 
At Your Service, Madame 
Speak No Evil 
I'm On a Seesaw 



Helen Harrigan 
Helen Dahill 
Ev Winship 
Wiggle 

Engla Anderson 
Bette Sands 
Gert McPike 
Annie Davis 
Dot Lindlad 
Dot Bell 
Rita Mulligan 
Dot Aronson 
Mim Cutting 
Maydell Champney 
Edna Zaleski 
Rhoda Barnicoat 
Ann Minichiello 
Ronnie Bahleda 
Marion Spring 
Lindy Scena 
Mary Benson 
Li I Stonkus 
Esther Howe 
Gertie Sjogren 
Irja Wiitanen 
Tony Walther 
Marguerite Philbin 
Brown and Oliver 
Ginny Giffin 
Dot Phelps 
Ginny Anderson 
Eleanor King 
Marge Whittier 
Edith Rose 
H e 1 ? ^ ; = e : 
Ruth Lyons 
Ruth Lovelace 
Jennie Wisowaty 

Margaret Shoultz 
Ellen Reynolds 
Peg Bauer 
Mamie Valentine 
Marge Baker 



BONERS IN SENIOR ENGLISH 

That fact that Milton was blind when he wrote "Paradise Lost" is to his credit. 
The "Wanderer" is a poem about a man who had the wanderlust. 
The various ballads include the "Broadway Ballads." 
Milton's blindness was quite depressing, so he wrote a sonnet. 
Before too long a time, Shakespeare left his wife and went to a drama school in 
London. 

The verse of "Paradise Lost" is hormonous. 

Bacon left the court of Elizabeth because she never quite trusted him. 

Utopia was the mother of wycli'rfe, the dragon whom Beowulf's mother slew. 

Satan is described as a man — possibly a worn out angel. 

Thomson was just a fly on the wall at the inn where they stayed. 

KNICK-KNACKS FROM ADVERTISEMENTS 

The pause that refreshes Between periods 

99 44-100% pure Senior Class 

I'd walk a mile A. A. Points 

They satisfy Vacations 

Tucker twins Helen Mace and Rita Kohler 

The school-girl complexion Kathleen Ryan 

His master's voice Lillian Greenglass 

The master mind Rosamund Hurley 

Bottled Sunshine Chubby Doran 

Don't be fat R. Philibosian 

4 out of 5 have it Sleeping sickness 

57 varieties Excuses for the Dean 

Keep in shape Dancing class 

I couldn't sit, 

couldn't stand, Riding class 
couldn't even lie down 

Learn to be charming Miss Kingman 

DO YOU REMEMBER 

The night there were five in two beds in Peirce Hall. 

The menu of marshmallows and corn fritters on the overnight hike. 

The problems of the Freshmen English class. 

The initiative course in gardening with cabbages coming up in place of cosmos. 

Chubby Doran as an angel. 

The trip to Fort Meadow. 

The squirrels discussing the nut budget. 

Miss Wineglass. 

The royal welcome we received from Student Government President our Freshmen year. 

The day Cynthia took us for a ride up curbstones and through policemen. 

The missing poetry books. 

The party in the C. C. Cottage. 



CHOICE BITS FROM TEACHING 

A. Geoghegan: How do you spell silo? 

Bright Pupil: (After much deliberation) s-i-g-h (pause) l-o-w. 

C. Kenway took lessons in skipping around the playground. 

P. O'Malley discussing the story, Dan's Boy, And what is Dan s nickname? 
Small boy: Mother Nature. 

Anna Smith was talking to the class about Christmas trees and told them she wasn't 
going to have one at home (because everyone was grown up). A little girl went up to 
Anna at recess and said she knew why they both weren't going to have trees. They were 
both Jewish. 

R. Philibosian: What sre you crying for? 

Little boy: That kid over there threw my nose on the ground. 

CHOICE BITS ANYWAY 

M. Bond: Did you see Anne and Kay at Travis's? 

C. Kenway: No, they're in the drugstore. 

Miss Gerritson: Why did Caesar go to Britain? 
Anonymous: Afternoon tea. 

Dr. Meier: What use does man make of grass? 

D. Perkins: Grass skirts. 

Mr. Workman: What are Genes? (In connection with heredity.) 
Voice in rear: Overalls. 

Does anyone know why Annie Davis broke the camera when she had her picture 
taken? 



wo 



nder where Jackie Hall's "Count'' went, Where, oh, where can he be? 



Discussing acquired and inherited traits: 

Mr. Workman: So after cutting off the tails of twenty generations of mice, the 
twenty-first generation was still born with a tail; this shows. . . . 
M. Philbin: Yes, but is the tail acquired? 

Dr. Foster: Well, what are his reasons for being a vegetarian? 
E. Anderson: Oh, he's a pacifist. 

One Senior to a friend: Say, whose pictures irz these in my envelope? 

V. Bahleda (in children's clothing): Then the mother can hook rugs for the nursery. 
D. Aronson: Yes but don't let her get caught! 

M. Shoultz: Say, Gert, did you see what the photographer can do to correct your 
defects? 

G. McPike: No, what? 

M. Shoultz: Remove blemishes, scars, deep shadows etc. 

G. McPike: Well, while he's about it, I might as well get a good job done and 
have my face lifted. 



Did you know that Kay Brosnan is so aristocratic that she won't eat a hot dog 
(frankfurter to you) unless it is registered at the kennel club? 

J. Wisowaty: Did you know that my father was a Pole? 
A friend: North or South? 

Heard at the Gate-Post Dance: 

He: You certainly picked a lemon as far as dancing goes. 

She: (at the end of the first dance): Well, I think you got your fruits mixed. (She 
didn't want to tell him that he was a peach.) 

Heard about the campus: 

That Marg Baker knows a lot of stories about Winthrop. 
That January, 1936 proved a delightful month for "Ding" Bell. 
That "Benny" likes to go to clothing with her hair freshly waved. 
That Dell Champney knows Piccillo Peter without the picillo. 
That Irja and Mim like hot dog roasts, big fires and R. I. C. C. pop. 
That a certain girl always gets her work in on time,- don't you, Annie? 
That Jackie lost her "count." 

That Wells, Maine has a certain lure for "Daisy" and Lacky. 
That "Rosebuds" were once preferred by a certain blond. 
That Bette Sands has "aristocratic" angles. 
That Marie Schweitzer likes "Red" hair. 
That Lil still likes 28 Cooper. 

That Betty Sullivan has altered her preferences and now finds herself satisfied with 
basketball players. 

That the U. S. Coast Guards aren't a bad "lot" am I right? 

That Poland isn't too far from the U. S. is it Edna? 

That the A. O. H. is still flourishing and doing all right by itself; isn't it so, girls? 

Gertrude McPike. 
Dorothy Perkins. 










SEEN ABOUT CAMPUS 



^ 



"THE BUTCHER, THE BAKER 
THE CANDLESTICK MAKER" 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Compliments of the 




enior v_^ lass 




o 



1936 




Better Food for 
__ _ Health and Pleasure 

Thousands of New England women have discovered that for wholesome flavorful 
foods — whether the staples for everyday cookery or the luxuries for parties, teas, 
formal dinners or holiday spreads — they can turn to the S. S. Pierce Co., confident 
that their wants will be satisfactorily and economically filled. 

S. S. Pierce's splendid variety of foods brings enjoyment to the table. The service 
makes ordering a pleasure, and the prices appeal to people who understand good 
value. Visit the S. S. Pierce stores or avail yourself of the expert telephone or mail 
order service. 

Send for "The Epicure" it contains our complete price list as well as 
entertaining and informative articles on cooking and dining. 



We Deliver by Our Own Trucks in Framingham 



Mail Orders Promptly Filled. 



COPLEY SQUARE TREMONT AND BEACON STS. 133 BROOKLINE AVE. 

COOLIDGE CORNER, BROOKLINE NEWTON CENTRE BELMONT 



Framingham Laundry 

ELBIN F. LORD, Manaser 

162 HOWARD STREET 
FRAMINGHAM MASS. 

Telephone Framingham 7163 



Careful Launderers 
of all Washable Material 

The largest and best equipped 
Laundry in Framingham or vicinity 



Samuel Holmes J. Frederick Holmes 

Frank W. Holmes 

SAMUEL HOLMES 

(INCORPORATED) 

Wholesale and Retail 
Poultry and Game 



Stalls 19-20-21-23-25 

Faneuil Hall Market 

Basement 3 and 4 South Side 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Tel. Capitol 0708-0709-0710 



Compliments of 

viaenis V_^ o=operalive ^yjissocialion 

Officers of 1935-1936 
President . . . MARJORIE WHITTIER 

Vice-President . . . . BETTY OLIVER 

Secretary .... BETTY RYDER 

Treasurer . . . HELEN C CHASE 



OPPORTUNITY 

To zvzry man there openeth a way and ways and a way, 

And the high soul climbs the highway, and the low soul gropes the low 

And inbetween are the misty flats, the rest drift to and fro 

But to every man there openeth, a high way and a low. 

And every man decideth, the way his soul should go. 



* * * * 



Compliments of the 



unior 




ass 



B. B. McKeever, Pres. 



F. B. Tyler, Treas. 



Lowell Bros. & Bailey Co. 
FRUIT and PRODUCE 

Tel. Capitol 8790-8791-8792-8793-8794 
47-48 South Market Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Phones Laf. 4670-4671 

A, J. FLEMING CO, 

Fancy Dressed Meats 

13-15 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Lafayette 1900 



Bolton-Smart Company, Inc. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 

Beef, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Poultry, Fish 

Butter, Cheese, Eggs 

Fruit and Vegetables 



Specializing in Catering to 
Schools, Institutions and Hotels 



19-25 SOUTH MARKET STREET 

41 FISH PIER 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Compliments of the 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



SHATTUCK & JONES 

(INCORPORATED) 

152 ATLANTIC AVENUE 
BOSTON MASS. 



Compliments of 



FRIEND 



Compliments of the 



MUSICAL CLUBS 



Compliments of the 



OOBIM 



iinore v^las 



CL 



"All the arts are brothers — each one 

is a light to the others.'' 

Voltaire. 



c 



omplime 



nts of 



The Friendly Foice 

Station WEEI keenly appreciates the 

place of radio in education. Many 
programs currently attest the station's 
devotion to this phase of service 
broadcasting 

For the better radio programs, listen 

on the WEEI wavelength — 590 kilo- 
cycles 

Sta-WEEI-tion 

The Boston Edison Company 



Compliments of 

THOMAS A'KEMPIS 




Sixty Years^of CorrectJCateringJService 

LUNCHEONS TEA DINNERS 

Caterers to Framingham Normal School 

Main Office: 110 Norway Street, Boston 



Compliments of 

Beattie & McGuire, Inc. 

29 TEMPLE PLACE 
BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone Liberty 5753 



Compliments of 

Jr. JL IL $an*all 

Dentist 

Smith Building 

FRAMINGHAM, MASS. 



Compliments of 
General Ice Cream Corp. 

183 CAMBRIDGE STREET 
EAST CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



The B & W L 


ines 


De Luxe Motor Coaches 


Students' Monthly 


Pass 


General Offices 




FRAMINGHAM, 


MASS. 


Tel. Fram. 4343 





Union Bookbinding Company 

(Incorporated) 

Established 1890 

Editions and Pamphlets 

Loose Leaf Binders 

and 

Special Covers for Every Purpose 

School Annual Covers and Binding 

289 Congress Street, Boston, Mass. 



fjf mho niter tyne on refresh- 
ment bent — 
g>ljall liielcome he anfo fortlj- 
uiith. blessings sent. 

ARTHUR J. TRAVIS, INC. 
THE REXALL STORE 



Compliments of 

J. 



125 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Cap and Gown Outfitters 







Y. 


w. 


c. 


A, 




Enough, 


if somethin 


g from our 


hands 


To 


have power 
live, and act, ar 


id serve the 


future 




h 


our. 






Wordsworth. 



Photographs 
Miniatures 
Charcoals 
Pastels 
Portraits in Oils 



Photographers for 

THE DIAL 



GHERIN GALLERY 

969 Great Plain Avenue 
Tel. Needham 1062 

NEEDHAM - BOSTON 



GEORGE W. JOHNSON 



<n 





e ress 

COMPLETE PRINTING SERVICE 



ctfiinlers of ( 'CL LD'ial Jor 1934*1935=1Q36 



842 CENTRE AVENUE 



Telephone Newton North 0077 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




A. A. Overflows With Activity 



if we made it, it s right" 



CLASS RINGS and PINS 

PRIZE CUPS 

TROPHIES - PLAQUES 



73 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Compliments of the 



Ooiiie ll__/coiioiiiics UmII 



TJie Grace Mo Aiioit 
1 ©ackers' Agency 

GRACE M. ABBOTT, Mana g er 

120 BOYLSTON STREET 
BOSTON 

Member National Association of Teachers' 
Agencies 




I)j~aiirinxj6 and 



Specialists ir\Desic£r\s SEt\^raVir^s 
for School at\d Gollede /lrvt\u,als 




T 
Y 



BICKFORD 

ENGRAVING & ELECTROTYPE CO. 

20 MATHEWSON ST,- PROVIDENCE, R. 



c 

E 



Mfls 



H 




2&w 

H tf P.TF>ORD 




> 






NEW^HflVEN